Spencer boys basketball moves to 4-0 with blowout of Loyal

first_imgBy Paul LeckerSports ReporterLOYAL — The Spencer boys basketball team remains unbeaten this season after whipping Loyal 71-42 in a Cloverbelt Conference East Division game Friday night at Loyal High School.Bobby Pilz had 21 points, and Miles Weber added 13 for the Rockets, who are now 4-0 overall and 3-0 in the Cloverbelt East.Cameron Brussow had 12 points to top Loyal (3-3, 2-3 Cloverbelt East).Spencer led 27-15 at halftime before scoring 44 points in the second half to finish off the victory.Spencer’s next game is Tuesday at home against Neillsville. Neillsville is in first place in the conference with a 4-0 mark (4-1 overall).(Hub City Times Sports Reporter Paul Lecker is also the publisher of MarshfieldAreaSports.com.)Rockets 71, Greyhounds 42Spencer 17 10 22 22 – 71Loyal 11 4 13 14 – 42SPENCER (71): Jonny Tomke 0-1 0-0 0, Noah Zastrow 1-1 0-0 2, Nate Mercier 2-3 0-0 4, Calvin Lenz 3-4 0-3 6, Bobby Pilz 9-11 1-2 21, Miles Weber 6-7 1-2 13, Jack Burnett 1-1 0-0 2, Jake Meyers 0-1 0-0 0, Ryan Busse 4-7 0-0 8, Mitch Susa 3-12 0-0 7, Dakota Andreae 4-8 0-1 8. FG: 33-56. FT: 2-8. 3-pointers: 3-10 (Pilz 2-3, Susa 1-6, Mecier 0-1). Record: 4-0, 3-0 Cloverbelt East.LOYAL (42): Riley Geiger 4-13 0-0 11, Derrick Howard 2-3 0-0 4, Colton Roehl 2-7 0-0 4, Cameron Brussow 4-12 2-3 12, Ryley Fischer 0-3 2-2 2, Logan Genteman 2-2 0-2 4, Ben Zimmerman 1-2 0-0 3, Tyler Prust 1-5 0-2 2. FG: 16-47. FT: 4-9. 3-pointers: 6-16 (Geiger 3-7, Brussow 2-4, Zimmerman 1-2, Prust 0-2, Roehl 0-1). Record: 3-3, 2-3 Cloverbelt East.last_img read more

DC Increases Property Tax Rates

first_imgThe District of Columbia changes the property tax rates for commercial and industrial real property, known as Class 2 properties, under emergency legislation. The legislation contains a new rate schedule for Class 2 properties. The rates will apply as of October 1, 2018.Property Taxes on Commercial and Industrial PropertyAs part of emergency legislation for funding the arts, the D.C. Council has changed the tax rate schedule for commercial and industrial real estate. The new rates apply to the sum of both real property tax rates and special real property tax rates. Applicable October 1, 2018, the property tax rates will be:– $1.65 for each $100 of assessed value if the real property’s assessed value is not greater than $5 million;– $1.77 for each $ 100 of assessed value if the real property’s assessed value is greater than $5,000,000 but not greater than $10 million; or– $1.89 for each $ 100 of assessed value if the real property’s assessed value is greater than $10 million.The legislation also makes increases to sales tax rates.Act 22-458 (D.C.B. 22-922), Laws 2018, effective October 3, 2018, for a 30-day period that expires December 31, 2018Login to read more tax news on CCH® AnswerConnect or CCH® Intelliconnect®.Not a subscriber? Sign up for a free trial or contact us for a representative.last_img read more

Discovered a disease? WHO has new rules for avoiding offensive names

first_imgThe World Health Organization (WHO) mostly works to reduce the physical toll of disease. But last week it turned to another kind of harm: the insult and stigma inflicted by diseases named for people, places, and animals. Among the existing monikers that its new guidelines “for the Naming of New Human Infectious Diseases” would discourage: Ebola, swine flu, Rift Valley Fever, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and monkey pox. Instead, WHO says researchers, health officials, and journalists should use more neutral, generic terms, such as severe respiratory disease or novel neurologic syndrome.Many scientists agree that disease names can be problematic, but they aren’t sure the new rulebook is necessarily an improvement. “It will certainly lead to boring names and a lot of confusion,” predicts Linfa Wang, an expert on emerging infectious diseases at the Australian Animal Health Laboratory in Geelong. “You should not take political correctness so far that in the end no one is able to distinguish these diseases,” says Christian Drosten, a virologist at the University of Bonn, Germany.Naming diseases has long been a fraught process. Badly chosen names can stigmatize people, as did gay-related immune deficiency, an early name for AIDS. They can also lead to confusion and hurt tourism and trade. The so-called swine flu, for instance, is not transmitted by pigs, but some countries still banned pork imports or slaughtered pigs after a 2009 outbreak. More recently, some Arab countries were unhappy that a new disease caused by a coronavirus was dubbed Middle East respiratory syndrome.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Although “it’s usually scientists who come up with these names … the WHO gets the diplomatic pressure” if someone takes offense, Drosten says. The new guidelines, released 8 May, aim to smooth the process. “The WHO had to do something to take itself out of the firing line,” Drosten says.Given that news of a new pathogen often spreads quickly, “it is important that an appropriate disease name is assigned by those who first report” the disease, WHO’s guidance notes. Following the guidelines, it adds, could “minimize unnecessary negative impact of disease names on trade, travel, tourism or animal welfare, and avoid causing offence to any cultural, social, national, regional, professional or ethnic groups.”To that end, new disease names should not include geographic locations; the names of people, occupations, animals, or food; or “terms that incite undue fear” (such as unknown, fatal, and epidemic). Instead, the names should use generic descriptions of symptoms (respiratory disease or watery diarrhea) and specific terms describing patients, epidemiology or the environment (juvenile, maternal, seasonal, summer, coastal), as well as pathogen names and arbitrary identifiers (alpha, beta, 1, 2, 3).The group that came up with these recommendations met “more than a few times” over the course of a year, says Kazuaki Miyagishima, director for food safety, zoonoses, and foodborne diseases at WHO, and a member of the panel. Among the ideas they discussed: naming diseases after Greek gods, using a system similar to the one used to name comets or alternating male and female names as is done with hurricanes.”But while naming a hurricane Katrina may not offend people, if we do it for a disease, it’s not just a hurricane for 1 week. It will make its way into the history of human suffering,” Miyagishima says.The guide is well intentioned, but goes too far, says Ian Lipkin, a virologist at Columbia University. “I don’t see how it will be helpful to eliminate names like monkey pox that provide insights into natural hosts and potential sources of infection,” he says.It could also become harder to easily distinguish diseases. For instance, under the new rules, Marburg disease (named after a city in Germany) might have been called filovirus-associated haemorrhagic fever 1, while Ebola (named after a river) might have been filovirus-associated haemorrhagic fever 2. Such bland names “lose something that is more than just quaint,” says Howard Markel, a medical historian at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. Drosten adds that geographic names are sometimes justified. It was clear that MERS, for example, was associated with the Middle East. “Would it have been better if we had named it novel betacoronavirus clade C, type 1?” he asks.The new rules make for more difficult names, Miyagishima admits. “But we think we have left a fairly large area for freedom. We do not want to kill the creativity of researchers completely.”Linfa Wang knows all about the difficulty of naming diseases. Two decades ago, he named a virus and the disease it causes after Hendra, a suburb of Brisbane, Australia; he still gets angry calls from residents complaining that the name has hurt property values. These days his strategy is to “go small.” Recently, he named a new henipavirus isolated in a neighborhood called Cedar Grove simply Cedar virus.Virologists encountered other sensitivities with Norwalk virus, named for a city in Ohio. The pathogen is the only species in the genus Norovirus and usually that name is used. In 2011, however, a Japanese individual asked for a change because many people in Japan carry the surname Noro. The International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses recommended using “Norwalk virus” instead.Acronyms are another good solution, says Ab Osterhaus, a virologist at Erasmus MC in Rotterdam, because they keep names short (another WHO recommendation) and people often forget what the letters stand for. But even acronyms can cause controversy. In 2003, WHO officials coined SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) to describe a novel pneumonia spreading in Asia, partly to avoid a name like “Chinese flu.” SARS did not go down well in Hong Kong, however, which is officially known as Hong Kong SAR, for special administrative region.Giving new diseases a number may be the only way to avoid such issues, researchers say. There is precedent. Growing up in China in the late 1960s, Wang remembers that diseases had digits. “I was really scared of number 5 disease,” he recalls. “I don’t know why, you just really did not want to get disease number 5.”last_img read more

Spinning black holes could fling off clouds of dark matter particles

first_img By Adrian ChoFeb. 22, 2017 , 2:45 PM A spinning black hole (white) should produce huge clouds of particles called axions (blue), which would then produce detectable gravitational waves, a new calculation predicts. Masha Baryakhtar Spinning black holes could fling off clouds of dark matter particles Few things are more mind bending than black holes, gravitational waves, and the nearly massless hypothetical particles called axions, which could be the mysterious dark matter whose gravity holds galaxies together. Now, a team of theoretical physicists has tied all three together in a surprising way. If the axion exists and has the right mass, they argue, then a spinning black hole should produce a vast cloud of the particles, which should, in turn, produce gravitational waves akin to those discovered a year ago by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). If the idea is correct, LIGO might be able to detect axions, albeit indirectly.“It’s an awesome idea,” says Tracy Slatyer, a particle astrophysicist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, who was not involved in the work. “The [LIGO] data is going to be there, and it would be amazing if we saw something.” Benjamin Safdi, a theoretical particle physicist at MIT, is also enthusiastic. “This is really the best idea we have to look for particles in this mass range,” he says.A black hole is the intense gravitational field left behind when a massive star burns out and collapses to a point. Within a certain distance of that point—which defines the black hole’s “event horizon”—gravity grows so strong that not even light can escape. In September 2015, LIGO detected a burst of ripples in space called gravitational waves that emanated from the merging of two black holes.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The axion—if it exists—is an uncharged particle perhaps a billionth as massive as the electron or lighter. Dreamed up in the 1970s, it helps explain a curious mathematical symmetry in the theory of particles called quarks and gluons that make up protons and neutrons. Axions floating around might also be the dark matter that’s thought to make up 85% of all matter in the universe. Particle physicists are searching for axions in experiments that try to convert them into photons using magnetic fields.But it may be possible to detect axions by studying black holes with LIGO and its twin detectors in Louisiana and Washington states, argue Asimina Arvanitaki and Masha Baryakhtar, theorists at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Canada, and their colleagues.If its mass is in the right range, then an axion stuck in orbit around a black hole should be subject to a process called superradiance that occurs in many situations and causes photons to multiply in a certain type of laser. If an axion strays near, but doesn’t cross, a black hole’s event horizon, then the black hole’s spin will give the axion a boost in energy. And because the axion is a quantum particle with some properties like those of the photon, that boost will create more axions, which will, in turn, interact with the black hole in the same way. The runaway process should thus generate vast numbers of the particles.But for this to take place, a key condition has to be met. A quantum particle like the axion can also act like a wave, with lighter particles having longer wavelengths. For superradiance to kick in, the axion’s wavelength must be as long as the black hole is wide. So the axion’s mass must be extremely light: between 1/10,000,000 and 1/10,000 the range probed in current laboratory experiments. The axions wouldn’t just emerge willy-nilly, either, but would crowd into huge quantum waves like the orbitals of the electrons in an atom. As fantastical as that sounds, the basic physics of superradiance is well established, Safdi says.The axion cloud might reveal itself in multiple ways, Baryakhtar says. Most promising, axions colliding in the cloud should annihilate one another to produce gravitons, the particles thought to make up gravitational waves just as photons make up light. Emerging from orderly quantum clouds, the gravitons would form continuous waves with a frequency set by the axion’s mass. LIGO would be able to spot thousands of such sources per year, Baryakhtar and colleagues estimate in a paper published 8 February in Physical Review D—although tracking those continuous signals may be harder than detecting bursts from colliding black holes. Spotting multiple same-frequency sources would be a “smoking gun” for axions, Slatyer says.The axion clouds could produce indirect signals, too. In principle, a black hole can spin at near light speed. However, generating axions would sap a black hole’s angular momentum and slow it. As a result, LIGO should observe that the spins of colliding black holes never reach that ultimate speed, but top out well below it, Baryakhtar says. Detecting that limit on spin would be challenging, as LIGO can measure a colliding black hole’s spin with only 25% precision.Safdi cautions that the analysis assumes that LIGO will see lots of black-hole mergers and will perform as expected. And if LIGO doesn’t see the signals, it won’t rule out the axion, he says. Still, he says, “This is probably the most promising paper I’ve seen so far on the new physics we might probe with gravitational waves.”last_img read more

Two decades of Federer, and still going strong

first_imgView comments MOST READ PH military to look into China’s possible security threat to power grid Bencic missed five months of 2017 after undergoing wrist surgery.“She had a tough year after that so it’s nice to see her back in shape as well,” Federer said.Three guaranteed matches in the Hopman Cup’s round robin stages are a perfect preparation for Federer, who also thrives in the relaxed setting of Perth with his family in tow.He will be up against American world number eight Jack Sock in his pool, while he could face Germany’s world number four Alexander Zverev playing in the opposite side of the draw in the final.While Federer is a tour veteran, Zverev’s coming-of-age campaign saw him win five titles and become one of just four men to beat the Swiss great this year, in the Montreal final.His progress up the rankings has marked him out as the most likely of the current crop of youngsters to translate his talent into Grand Slam titles.The tall German had a roller-coaster year at the Slams — a last-16 spot at Wimbledon, but also a first-round loss in Paris, a second-round exit in New York and a third-round defeat to Nadal in Australia.Zverev will partner former world number one Angelique Kerber, and they kick off their Hopman Cup campaign against Belgium’s David Goffin and Elise Mertens.Vasek Pospisil and Eugenie Bouchard are in Canada’s team along with Germany, Belgium and Australia in Pool A.Russia will be represented by Karen Khachanov and Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, while Yuichi Sugita and Naomi Osaka are playing for Japan both in Pool B. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Napier’s season-high 23 rally Blazers past 76ers LATEST STORIES Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Jordan delivers on promise: 2 Cobra choppers now in PH ‘We cannot afford to fail’ as SEA Games host – Duterte Federer finished the year at number two in the world behind Spanish rival Rafael Nadal, having started at 16, after a season-leading seven titles, including three Masters at Indian Wells, Miami and Shanghai.It was a sensational season by any standards, but especially as Federer has been playing professional tennis since 1998 — a year when Bill Clinton was president of the United States, and James Cameron’s “Titanic” won 11 Oscars.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingFederer will again partner Belinda Bencic at the Hopman Cup, his only event before launching his Australian Open title defence on January 15.“It’s totally different this time around,” said Federer, whose appearance at the previous edition of the Hopman Cup followed a rare six-month absence as he recovered from injury. ‘A complete lie:’ Drilon refutes ‘blabbermouth’ Salo’s claims BeautyMNL open its first mall pop-up packed with freebies, discounts, and other exclusives Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim “I had a great off-season. I mean, I did have a good off-season too last year but I just wasn’t sure what to expect.“Now expectations are higher but at the same time I try to remind myself, ‘Just don’t think it’s normal and realistic to aim for the same things I did this year in 2017’.“I’ve got to try and keep it cool, try my best and see what happens — but the preparation’s been good so far.” Relaxed settingFederer and Bencic teamed for the first time at last year’s Hopman Cup, only just missing out on sending Switzerland into the final.ADVERTISEMENT SEA Games: PH still winless in netball after loss to Thais Switzerland’s Roger Federer waves to the crowd as he leaves the court after losing to Belgium’s David Goffin during their men’s singles semi-final match on day seven of the ATP World Tour Finals tennis tournament at the O2 Arena in London on November 18, 2017.David Goffin won 2-6, 6-3, 6-4. / AFP PHOTO / Glyn KIRKThe amazing Roger Federer will embark on his 21st professional season when he leads Switzerland in the mixed teams Hopman Cup starting in Perth on Saturday.The 36-year-old Swiss is coming off an extraordinary year where he took his majors tally to 19, with a fifth Australian Open title and a record eighth Wimbledon.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

Everything freelancers need to know about disability insurance

first_imgFreelancing is precarious. With episodic income, it’s hard to take vacations or even sick days. But what if you’re injured or sick and unable to work for a while?Being a freelancer doesn’t have to mean being on your own in case an accident happens. Disability insurance ensures that you’ll have income, even if you’re unable to work.Here’s a comprehensive look at disability insurance — from the people who know freelancers best. Freelancers Union is the nation’s largest non-profit representing the independent workforce. We’ve been advocating for freelance workers for nineteen years and we’ve been helping freelancers get benefits for over ten of them. Check out the disability insurance plans we offer through our National Benefits Platform.Do I need disability insurance?Having disability insurance ensures that you’ll still have income if you’re unable to work due to a long-term injury, accident, or illness. It’s particularly important for freelancers, who don’t have the luxury of sick days or sick leave in the case of a life-altering event.Can I even get it as a freelancer?Yes, you can! You’ll need to report your income, but even freelancers can get disability insurance. Your disability insurance means you’ll get income replacement checks (like a paycheck) while you can’t work, as long as your claim is approved.How does it work?You sign up for a disability insurance plan depending on your income and how much you want to receive monthly in the event you’re unable to work for a long period of time. The premium you pay is scaled to the size of the monthly benefit you’d receive, so higher premium for higher monthly benefit.In the event of a life-altering accident, injury, or illness that renders you unable to work, after a waiting period (varying from plan to plan, generally from 30-90 days) you’ll receive benefit checks of the amount you signed up for. Monthly checks will be issued during the period of your disability, based on the terms of the plan you select. Depending on the plan, coverage may stop at age 65.What are my options?You can purchase disability insurance plans from a number of private insurance companies, including at Freelancers Union’s National Benefits Platform. Plans will differ by the amount of coverage they provide and how long you’ll need to wait before you can collect benefits.There are also plans that are intended to cover your credit while you’re unable to work, rather than your income. These plans pay out disability checks towards your mortgage or a loan payment you may have been working on.Is there anything else I should know?Freelancers might not think they need disability insurance, but in fact, it’s pretty important! You’re your own boss… which means that the buck starts, and stops, with you. If you’re unable to work due to an accident, you might not have the same safety net 9-5 workers do. Disability insurance provides peace of mind with a relatively low premium per month. You can get coverage through our plans starting as low as $7.94/month.Freelancers Union offers access to a disability insurance plan through Guardian, with a 30 or 90 day waiting period, specifically designed for freelancers. You can check it out, along with our other benefits, at our National Benefits Platform.last_img read more