Teen `legislators’ turn to disaster readiness

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECasino Insider: Here’s a look at San Manuel’s new high limit rooms, Asian restaurant160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! MONROVIA – If 29 Monrovia teenagers from the Santa Anita YMCA Youth and Government program had their way, California high school students would see a slight modification to their curriculum in the near future. The YMCA mock legislators will introduce a bill at the 58th Annual Model Legislature and Court Program that, if passed by the real state government, would amend the state education code. The bill to be presented at the Feb.23-25 conference is titled, “Emergency Preparedness Orientation and Education,” inspired by the events that followed Hurricane Katrina, and would require that health curricula include instruction that would prepare students for emergencies created by earthquakes, hurricanes, floods and wildfires, to name a few. “We want to be able to help people if we had to deal with a natural disaster in California,” said Ashley Dunn, 17. “I think it has a good possibility of being passed because it is so relevant,” said Jennifer Postlewaite, the YMCA’s youth and family program director. Theimer, Dunn and their fellow delegates have spent the past six months deciding on a bill, drafting the bill, and selecting “mock” governmental positions. This is the second year Santa Anita has sent a delegation, which is one of the smaller groups going to Sacramento. “We are just big enough to be powerful.” Dunn said. bridget.schinnerer@sgvn.com (626)962-8811, Ext.2201last_img read more

It still works MCC on neutral Test umpires despite Ashes furore

first_imgLondon: The Marylebone Cricket Club, considered the custodian of the game’s laws, has backed neutral umpires in Test matches despite calls for a revamp after the opening Ashes Test was marred by a number of poor decisions. As many as 10 decisions by rookie West Indian umpire Joel Wilson and Pakistan’s Aleem Dar were overturned by the Decision Review System during last week’s Edgbaston Test. There were at least five more errors that went unreviewed. Also Read – Puducherry on top after 8-wkt win over Chandigarh Standing in only his 13th Test, Wilson equalled the record for reversals when eight of his decisions were successfully appealed by the players. But despite the gaffes, MCC insisted that neutral Test umpiring is still the best way forward. “It was obviously a bit of a focus after the last match. Ricky Ponting mentioned the prospect of bringing back non-neutral umpires and it is something being discussed by the ICC Cricket Committee as well. But the feeling is neutrality still works,” MCC Head of Cricket John Stephenson was quoted as saying by the media here. Also Read – Vijender’s next fight on Nov 22, opponent to be announced later Currently, seven of the 12-strong elite panel hail from England or Australia and Stephenson said the need of the hour is to invest more in raising the umpiring standard across the globe. During a two-day meeting of MCC’s Cricket Committee at Lord’s on Monday, which was attended by MCC chairman Mike Gatting, Stephenson and panel members Shane Warne and Kumar Sangakkara, it was also decided to increase the number of umpires in ICC’s elite panel. “Unfortunately there is quite an imbalance with ICC elite-level umpiring panel where you have certain umpires adjudicating in certain series. But we think it’s time for the base to be broadened and to train up more umpires to get to the elite levels,” Stephenson said. “Overall, we think neutrality does work. But with DRS and technology maybe it’s something we need look at in the future. “In one-day cricket we have one non-neutral umpire standing and in Twenty20 we have it as well. Maybe further down the line it can be a thing,” he added.last_img read more