Girls’ soccer: Wolverines claw back, win

first_imgAnother night, another set of heroes for the Harvard-Westlake of Studio City girls’ soccer team. Facing only their second deficit in Mission League play, the Wolverines responded with a convincing second-half performance to move a step closer to their sixth consecutive title. Donilyn Hunter-Sallustio and Jenna Marine scored goals seven minutes apart to lead Harvard-Westlake to a 2-1 victory Wednesday at Chaminade of West Hills, extending the Wolverines’ league unbeaten streak to 17 in a row. “We talked about making the first 10 minutes (of the second half) count because we didn’t want to be in a desperate situation,” said Harvard-Westlake coach Richard Simms, whose decision to move Mary Amato into the central midfield in the second half paid dividends. erik.boal@dailynews.com (818) 713-3607 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!center_img “These kids continue to rise to the occasion. You put a challenge in front of them and they’re going to meet it.” After misfiring on a few scoring opportunities in the first half, Marine converted for the Wolverines (13-7-4, 6-0-2) when it mattered most, completing a passing sequence that included Lizzy Danhakl and Coco Weaver by burying a 30-yard shot in the upper-right corner in the 52nd minute for the deciding goal. “Lizzy and Shannon (Hart) kept giving me perfect balls the whole game, so I was definitely hoping it was the one,” Marine said. “It was frustrating in the first half because I had so many shooting opportunities, so I’m glad I got one in.” Chaminade (7-9-2, 5-4) struck in the fifth minute when Alyssa Engstrom scored off Jordan Schoonover’s free kick. Hunter-Sallustio tied the score in the 45th minute, tapping in a loose ball after Amato’s high-arcing shot was dropped by goalkeeper Alex Bershon. “When you’re undefeated in a tough league, you find ways to win,” Chaminade coach Tracy Powell said. “Against Harvard-Westlake, you can’t afford to hold back with a 1-0 lead.” last_img read more

Arsenal and Chelsea target NOT FOR SALE, insists Roma sporting director

first_imgRoma sporting director Monchi has dismissed talk the club could sell Arsenal and Chelsea target Kostas Manolas before the transfer window closes.The defender looked certain to leave the Italian club earlier this summer after they accepted an offer of around £30million for him from Zenit St Petersburg.However, that move broke down and it then seemed possible the Greece international would end up at Chelsea instead.Blues boss Antonio Conte is a big fan of Manolas, but the Italian has failed to wrap up a deal for the centre-back.And now Roma’s sporting director, Monchi, has confirmed the 26-year-old will not be leaving this summer.“Manolas for sale? No, we are working to sign players, not sell them,” Monchi told Mediaset Premium.“I spend all day with the players and can see they have faith in the coach and the system they are adopting.” 1 Roma star Kostas Manolas will not be sold with only weeks left of the transfer window last_img read more

Nedbank, AMD connect schools

first_img5 April 2007South African financial services group Nedbank and American technology company Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) have entered into a partnership to provide technology solutions to five historically disadvantaged schools in the country.The two companies opened the first fully equipped computing centre at the Nelson R Mandela High School in Gugulethu outside Cape Town on Monday.The school was selected as the first of several schools that will implement Learning Labs, and the companies hope it will have a lasting impact on Gugulethu.Learning Labs is an initiative by AMD to provide benefactors with computers and internet connectivity, as well as professional, educational and personal development tools to provide new ways for teachers and pupils to interact with each other.The labs feature systems capable of operating Windows or Linux and come with installed content and applications. To ensure the sustainability of the project, the partners will also provide the schools with teacher training programmes and maintenance and support for the labs.Microsoft, Cisco, Tarsus, First for Business, CompuTainer, @tlantic and Learnthings will also provide additional support for the Learning Labs.“We are confident that this learning lab and the others to follow it will greatly enhance the local educational system’s ability to provide students with the skills and information they need to achieve success in an increasingly competitive, digital world,” said Nedbank South Africa chief executive Tom Boardman.He said the partnership was an innovative way to meet the needs of South African communities and address the digital divide. The labs also use low-power systems that are compact and sealed, enabling them to last in a harsh environment.Several Learning Labs around the world together form part of AMD’s 50×15 initiative, launched at the World Economic Forum’s annual meeting in 2004, which aims to provide access to computing and internet connectivity to 50% of the world’s population by 2015.“The positive effects of the Learning Labs extend beyond the students and teachers at the schools and into the greater community by providing an incredible community resource for educational and economic development opportunities,” said AMD vice president Gautam Srivastava.According to the AMD statement, experience at previous lab deployments have shown that access the internet persuades students to stay enrolled in school for longer and make use of the available technology.The two partners want to learn from their experiences in Gugulethu, hoping it will enable them to expand the Nedbank-AMD 50×15 partnership across South Africa in the “coming months”.SouthAfrica.info reporter Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

5 Principles for a More Effective Nonprofit Website

first_imgMake it easy for people to share and connect. Finally, make it easy for people to connect with you and share your site with their friends by including buttons and links to Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. When it comes to your donate button, think big, bold and above the fold. Make it easier for people to give online by helping supporters find your button in the first place. Put it on every page of your website. Stay away from vague words like “support” or “help.” If you want people to donate, say “donate now.” Determine what you want visitors do and offer a clear call to action. Think about the most important things you want a visitor to do and make the pages of your website clearly guide visitors toward those actions. Note: You may want to alter your calls to actions at different times of the year. Use more photos and video to showcase your work. The quickest way to make an emotional connection with your website visitors is to, in a sense, make eye contact with them. This is why a photo of one person or animal you are helping works much better than an image of an inanimate object. Don’t let your perceived level of quality hold you back – whether you caught a clip of a child saying thank you at your last event with your iPhone or took candid photos of volunteers helping in a soup kitchen – the authenticity will shine through.center_img Your nonprofit website is a critical resource for engaging with three important audiences:All of your constituents, including volunteers, alumni, members and advocacy supportersAll of your donors – both current and prospectivePeople who have little to no previous knowledge about your nonprofit.Whether you plan a total redesign or just a few tweaks, a few simple changes to your website can make a big difference in how people perceive and interact with your cause. Ditch the text. Familiar with the phrase “less is more”? People do not read websites—they scan them. Think in terms of headings, bullets, lists and images. When it comes to adding text to your site, be ruthless. Eliminate unnecessary words or phrases and make the ones you do include count by making them clear and compelling.last_img read more

Are you as “social” as other nonprofits?

first_imgInterestingly, these numbers put nonprofits ahead of their for-profit counterparts in the small business world: “Ninety-six percent of nonprofits said they were on Facebook vs. 90% of small businesses. And 80% of nonprofits on Facebook reported posting on the site multiple times per week, vs. 66% of small businesses,” says eMarketer. Nonprofits said they were increasing their marketing spend on social media by 10% this year. Though to put matters in perspective, that may not be a lot in real dollars. Studies last year found 43% budget $0 for their social networking activities (aside from staff time).I think that the embrace of social media is wise for nonprofits for several reasons. While it may not drive big return on investment in fundraising dollars, it’s a relatively inexpensive and effective way of raising visibility, generating social proof around a cause and inspiring future actions in support of a cause.At the end of the day, most people come to learn and love a cause via friends and family. Through social media, nonprofits can facilitate and amplify that natural word of mouth. No wonder droves of nonprofits are doing just that. While nonprofits may be behind the curve in some matters, we’ve done a swift job of adopting social media. As I’ve noted here before based on past surveys, the vast majority of nonprofits are actively using Facebook and Twitter.Some new research featured in eMarketer bolsters that view:last_img read more

Why you may need to reboot

first_imgIn Ctrl Alt Delete Mitch Joel issues a wake-up call for those that may find themselves lost in a rapidly evolving landscape of technology, media, and marketing. Joel, president of the digital marketing agency Twist Image, offers sharp insights on how these changes affect the way we learn, shop, communicate, and work. It’s an important reality check for nonprofit marketers because these factors directly affect how supporters and partners will interact with your cause. Organizations that understand and adapt to these new opportunities will thrive, while those who resist will find themselves struggling to connect with donors in the years to come.The book starts off with one of the most critical lessons for any marketer, especially those working in the nonprofit sector: embracing the shift toward more direct relationships with your consumers (donors), is no longer optional. People now have more access to information about your nonprofit, your impact, and *you* than ever before. Organizations and supporters are at each other’s fingertips, so it’s impossible (and unwise) to avoid direct contact with those who are interested in your work. Online or off, focus on creating and building relationships to succeed in raising money, spreading your message, and serving your cause. By the way, these relationships should be the two-way street kind. If you’re only broadcasting messages focused on your organization’s needs, you may need a reboot.Here are four tactics Mitch Joel recommends for building those direct relationships, and what they mean for your nonprofit.1) Deliver value. Stand out and earn loyalty by first providing value to your supporters. Of course, you’re doing great work for the people and communities you serve, but if you’re not building long-term relationships with potential supporters, you’re missing out on a bigger opportunity. How do you do this? Start by focusing more on providing valuable resources to the people you’re trying to reach, instead of only talking about your needs. 2) Be open.You can’t build meaningful relationships without trust and transparency. This is paramount for nonprofits. Donors won’t fork over their hard-earned cash to support your cause if they aren’t sure where the money goes. Show that you are an organization they can trust by being open about how your organization is run and how you use donated funds. Welcome questions and be upfront and honest if you make a mistake. Hiding in the shadows only makes people nervous, which is not a great relationship-building vibe.3) Be clear and consistent.Do donors know what they can expect from your nonprofit? Can they count on you for all the right reasons? Review your organization’s outreach to make sure you’re saying what you think you’re saying. Consistency also includes communicating with your donors on a regular basis to help them feel involved in your work. This means not waiting to reach out to supporters when you’re looking for gifts in December. 4) Focus on fans. Joel says, “The majority of people do not want to friend or like your brand. They use their social graphs for friends, family, and those they made fun of in high school.” Ouch! My guess is that many nonprofits may have it a little easier than most corporate brands, but it’s important to remember. Rather than working to get as many “Likes” as possible, focus instead on providing value through your social media content and focus on your truly passionate superfans. Put these champions to work spreading the message about what you do and why it matters. Of course, these suggestions are just the tip of the reboot iceberg. Ctrl Alt Delete delivers plenty of juicy nuggets for all marketers to heed. What aspect of your outreach or fundraising strategy would you like to reboot?last_img read more

Amplify Your Fundraising with Recurring Gifts

first_imgDoes your nonprofit offer donors a recurring giving plan? If not, you’re leaving a lot of money on the table and ignoring some very dedicated supporters. Small monthly gifts can add up to a hefty sum at year end—maybe as much as four times your current donation rate. If you’re looking for a path to sustainable income, setting up a monthly giving program is the ideal way to get there.What is monthly giving?Also called recurring gifts, monthly giving plans simply allow donors to give a specified amount every month. It’s common in Europe, where donors are comfortable with the idea of “subscribing” to charities in the form of an automatic monthly credit card charge or electronic funds transfer (EFT). European nonprofits typically have 80% of their donors on a monthly giving plan.In a recent Nonprofit 911 webinar on recurring giving, only 24% of participants said their organization has a monthly giving program. We have a little work to do here, but recurring gifts are starting to gain momentum.Who are your monthly donors? Typically, monthly donors are what we’d call small givers, as in $100 or less per year. Unlike once-a-year donors, however, they’re super-committed and really care about your organization and its mission. They give automatically and usually with no end date. In fact, some organizations have monthly donors who’ve been giving that way for 20 years or more.Recurring gifts are great for reaching smaller donors who want to make a bigger difference but can’t write that $250 check. Many are happy to give just $10 or $20 per month, which is like writing a big check but shows even more commitment.Why is monthly giving so important?The primary benefit to recurring gifts, of course, is having regular income to sustain your nonprofit’s mission. You can count on a certain amount of money coming in each month and throughout your planning year. You’ll also get more money over time. Let’s say you have 100 one-time donors who each give $35. That equals $3,500 for the year. But when 100 people give $35 per month for a year? That’s $15,500 to benefit your cause. You’ve more than quadrupled your annual revenue!Another benefit: vastly improved retention rates. New-donor retention rates average less than 23%, meaning that only 23 of 100 first-time donors give again the next year. Of those 23 who renew their donations, you’ll typically retain only 61%, or 14 donors. Monthly giving programs, on the other hand, typically enjoy retention rates of 86% after one year and 95% after five years. The moral of the story: If you want to increase giving, build sustainable income, and improve retention rates, including a recurring gift option on your donation page is an absolute must. Adapted from Network for Good’s Nonprofit 911 webinar “How You Can Generate Long-Term Revenue from Recurring Giving” with Erica Waasdorp, president of A Direct Solution and author of Monthly Giving: The Sleeping Giant. Download the archived presentation.last_img read more

Quick Takeaways from the Pew Social Media Report

first_imgYou can download the full report from the Pew website.So what does this mean for your nonprofit marketing plans?Know your audience.Take the time to define the audience you’re trying to reach and understand where they’re spending their time. If your goal is to activate Boomers, assess your Facebook outreach and create content that appeals to their sense of identity and need for transparency. If you’re looking to mobilize younger supporters, consider documenting your work and the impact of donors via Instagram photos.Resist the urge to be everywhere.The Pew researchers found that 52% of online adults use multiple social media sites, which is an increase from 2013. For most nonprofits, though, it’s probably not advisable or realistic to spread resources too thin across multiple outlets. Your best bet, especially if you’re still establishing your social media strategy, is to focus on regular quality engagement on one platform. Measure your results and keep an eye on relevant activity on other networks before expanding. Remember: your social efforts need to reinforce your marketing efforts in other channels.Be realistic about your goals for social. We know that donors are engaging with nonprofits and each other on social, but most online dollars are coming in through non-social. Focus on using social as a listening and engagement platform, rather than expecting Twitter or Facebook to become your organization’s magic money machine. Think of social as a tool for understanding what interests your supporters and use your outreach to develop relationships with them.Carefully measure your ROI.Although Facebook is the most widely used social media site with the most engaged users, keep in mind that it is becoming increasingly more difficult to break through the noise (and the Facebook algorithm) and fully reach your audience through the platform. On the Care2 blog, Allyson Kapin recently outlined why it’s getting harder to see a return from Facebook advertising.Even if you’re not paying for social media advertising, weigh the time and attention your staff spends on social media with the results you see and progress to your goals. To get the most out social, you do need to commit to posting quality content and spending time building your presence and the relationships that result.Is social media on your 2015 list of priorities? Share your thoughts below and let us know how you’re incorporating Facebook, Twitter, and others into your nonprofit marketing strategy. The folks at the Pew Research Center recently published updates to their Social Media Report. Here are a few highlights:Facebook still reigns supreme. It comes as no surprise that 71% of all online adults are on Facebook, which also sees 70% of users engaging with the site at least daily.More older adults adopting social networks. But they’re mostly on Facebook. 56% of all online adults 65 and older now use Facebook, which equals 31% of all seniors. That said, all networks featured in the report saw significant jumps in the number of 65+ users.Visual platforms continue to emerge as key networks, especially with younger users. Over half of young adults (ages 18-29) online use Instagram. Nearly half of all Instagram users use the site daily.last_img read more

The Next Big Thing in Fundraising: Emoji Appeals

first_imgWe all know that mobile technology is changing the way we communicate, work, and give. It was only a matter of time before the popularity of emojis, those cute little icons you see in text messages and social media updates, made their way onto the fundraising scene. Now, entire appeals are being written just with emojis! Talk about the art of brevity! Check them out:This dog rescue gets right to the point. These dogs need your love, a good home, and your donation to support their care. Bonus points for the sense of urgency:Want to give back to your local education group? There’s an emoji appeal for that, too! I love how this organization outlines the option to give via mobile.Helping to support meal delivery to seniors in the neighborhood has never been easier! This appeal knocks it out of the park by clearly outlining who will benefit and exactly how a donor’s gift will be used:Pandas need your help now! This emoji appeal illustrates that short and sweet can work when it comes to inspiring donors to give.Want to reach those Millennial Alumni to help support your scholarship fund? Emojis to the rescue once again! I love that this appeal offers donors options for completing their donation.Here’s an example of a gala invitation. Who could resist attending a night out, complete with top hat, all to benefit a good cause?Of course, today is April 1, which means I’m just teasing about emoji appeals! Some things are no joke, though, like:Having a donor management system that allows you to effectively communicate with your donors through email.Making sure your appeals are rooted in a compelling story that elicits emotion from the donor.Paying attention to the power of mobile to encourage anytime, anywhere giving.Thanks for sharing a laugh with us today! We’ll be back with regularly-scheduled programming next week. In the meantime, share your favorite April Fool’s joke with us on Twitter.last_img read more

Part 2: The Continuum of Care: Call the Midwife

first_imgIn our first blog, Esther is faced with two issues: a) accessing information (long queues at the clinic) and b) accessing commodities (pregnancy test). Now, she is 31 weeks pregnant and though she’s been to the clinic twice, she still doesn’t know exactly what to do when the big day comes. And what if something strange happens before then? Should she call the midwife? Someone else? And how will she get to the clinic? What if there’s an emergency?She could really use some of the innovative services that are available in other countries, such asWomen’s groups in Bangladesh, India, Nepal and Malawi that discuss and find solutions to help improve maternal and child healthFather’s groups in Spain helping ensure that immigrants have access to servicesMaternity voucher schemes in IndiaMobile phones in Ghana that remind women of their appointments or their medication scheduleHealth promotion groups to encourage antenatal care uptake or address societal issues where the mother-in-law is the main decision-makerLow-cost, locally supported means of transportation such as ambulances, boats, cars, bikes or donkey carts in ZambiaEducation on nutrition and breastfeedingFree services such as China’s free postnatal care home serviceBut Esther also needs the health system to support her by providing quality services along the continuum of care throughout her pregnancy – from home to the clinic. To do this well, health care providers need to know Esther and understand her circumstances. They need to be able to provide the continuum of care as a team, integrating antenatal care with labour services and postnatal care, and providing that care as close as possible to Esther.The Manoshi project, for example, brought that level of care into the slum areas of Bangladesh. The project reduced the famous ”three delays” by providing solid health information on when referral might be necessary, keeping transportation means on stand-by, and dedicating staff to speed women through administrative requirements to facilitate access to emergency maternal and newborn care (EmONC) at the hospital.Midwife-led CareAn existing model of care that is gaining traction in countries like Esther’s is the midwife-led unit. Midwives are able to provide effective comprehensive care from pre-pregnancy through pregnancy, birth and the postnatal period. Setting up a midwife-led unit with a waiting home and close to a hospital means that women can easily access midwifery services throughout pregnancy and childbirth and, if needed, can be seamlessly transferred to next level care or EmONC services. To provide true continuum of care the midwife must be able to call on an obstetrician and the hospital at any time and be part of an integrated team of health care providers, associates and lay health workers that reach from the community to the hospital and keeps the woman and newborn at the center of care.Setting up such collaborative teams of providers requires quality education of all groups and effective regulation that supports and promotes their collaboration and integration. Providers also need continuing professional development, clear career pathways, and a regulatory environment that allows the provision of appropriate skill mix at all levels of the system.In the midwife-led unit, Esther, as a new mum, would also obtain information on postnatal care along with her newborn’s care: exclusive breastfeeding, basic hygiene, infection control, cord care, etc. Because the midwife has taken care of Esther from beginning to end, she will be familiar with her circumstances at home and can ensure that effective follow-up care is provided in her community.When asked, women made clear what they need for a healthy pregnancy. First, women feel that information and education are essential to allow them to learn for themselves. Also, they need to know and understand the organisation of services and receive care that is respectful and given by staff who engender trust, personalized to meet their individual needs, and offered by care providers who are kind. Making midwife-led units available is an effective way to increase the capacity of the health system, cover the needs of the population, contain costs, and increase user satisfaction. Midwife-led care is more than a simple win-win.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:,In our first blog, Esther is faced with two issues: a) accessing information (long queues at the clinic) and b) accessing commodities (pregnancy test). Now, she is 31 weeks pregnant and though she’s been to the clinic twice, she still doesn’t know exactly what to do when the big day comes. And what if something strange happens before then? Should she call the midwife? Someone else? And how will she get to the clinic? What if there’s an emergency?She could really use some of the innovative services that are available in other countries, such asWomen’s groups in Bangladesh, India, Nepal and Malawi that discuss and find solutions to help improve maternal and child healthFather’s groups in Spain helping ensure that immigrants have access to servicesMaternity voucher schemes in IndiaMobile phones in Ghana that remind women of their appointments or their medication scheduleHealth promotion groups to encourage antenatal care uptake or address societal issues where the mother-in-law is the main decision-makerLow-cost, locally supported means of transportation such as ambulances, boats, cars, bikes or donkey carts in ZambiaEducation on nutrition and breastfeedingFree services such as China’s free postnatal care home serviceBut Esther also needs the health system to support her by providing quality services along the continuum of care throughout her pregnancy – from home to the clinic. To do this well, health care providers need to know Esther and understand her circumstances. They need to be able to provide the continuum of care as a team, integrating antenatal care with labour services and postnatal care, and providing that care as close as possible to Esther.The Manoshi project, for example, brought that level of care into the slum areas of Bangladesh. The project reduced the famous ”three delays” by providing solid health information on when referral might be necessary, keeping transportation means on stand-by, and dedicating staff to speed women through administrative requirements to facilitate access to emergency maternal and newborn care (EmONC) at the hospital.Midwife-led CareAn existing model of care that is gaining traction in countries like Esther’s is the midwife-led unit. Midwives are able to provide effective comprehensive care from pre-pregnancy through pregnancy, birth and the postnatal period. Setting up a midwife-led unit with a waiting home and close to a hospital means that women can easily access midwifery services throughout pregnancy and childbirth and, if needed, can be seamlessly transferred to next level care or EmONC services. To provide true continuum of care the midwife must be able to call on an obstetrician and the hospital at any time and be part of an integrated team of health care providers, associates and lay health workers that reach from the community to the hospital and keeps the woman and newborn at the center of care.Setting up such collaborative teams of providers requires quality education of all groups and effective regulation that supports and promotes their collaboration and integration. Providers also need continuing professional development, clear career pathways, and a regulatory environment that allows the provision of appropriate skill mix at all levels of the system.In the midwife-led unit, Esther, as a new mum, would also obtain information on postnatal care along with her newborn’s care: exclusive breastfeeding, basic hygiene, infection control, cord care, etc. Because the midwife has taken care of Esther from beginning to end, she will be familiar with her circumstances at home and can ensure that effective follow-up care is provided in her community.When asked, women made clear what they need for a healthy pregnancy. First, women feel that information and education are essential to allow them to learn for themselves. Also, they need to know and understand the organisation of services and receive care that is respectful and given by staff who engender trust, personalized to meet their individual needs, and offered by care providers who are kind. Making midwife-led units available is an effective way to increase the capacity of the health system, cover the needs of the population, contain costs, and increase user satisfaction. Midwife-led care is more than a simple win-win. Posted on September 8, 2014November 2, 2016By: Petra ten Hoope-Bender, Director of Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn and Child Health, ICS Integrare; Sheetal Sharma, Research and Knowledge Management Associate, ICS IntegrareClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post is part of our “Continuum of Care” blog series hosted by the Maternal Health Task Forcelast_img read more