Embattled Nesta Carter to race this weekend

first_imgEmbattled Jamaican sprinter Nesta Carter will return to the track this weekend in his first meeting since he was stripped of his Beijing Olympics gold medal after a retroactive test uncovered a banned substance in his sample.Carter’s re-tested sample from 2008 was found to have traces of the banned stimulant methylhexaneamine, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) said last month.Jamaica’s 4×100 metres relay team that included Usain Bolt were stripped of their gold medals. Last year in Rio, Bolt completed a ‘treble treble’ of Olympic gold medals in winning the 100, 200 and 4×100 titles at three successive Games.Bolt has already returned his Beijing relay medal.Carter has said he would appeal to the Court of Arbitration for Sport.The 31-year-old Carter, who has not raced competitively for 17 months due to injury and then because he was notified of the positive test, will run at the Western Relays in Montego Bay, his manager Bruce James told Reuters.Carter has not been banned by world governing body the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) and correspondence between Jamaican athletics authorities and the IAAF seen by Reuters confirmed he would be clear to run until his appeal had been heard. (Life goes on for ‘disappointed’ Usain Bolt after losing gold medal)”Having consulted the IAAF Medical and Anti-Doping Department, it appears that Mr. Carter is not currently provisionally suspended,” IAAF chief executive Olivier Gers wrote in a letter in response to a query by Jamaican Athletics President Warren Blake.”He is eligible to compete in athletics competition pending the CAS proceedings.”advertisementCarter has until Feb. 15 to file his appeal with CAS.last_img read more

How to Keep the Lines of Donor Communication Open

first_imgSend Regular UpdatesAfter you’ve thanked your donors, send them regular updates detailing the ongoing impact of their gift. They’ll be pleased to know that their donation is being put to good use and might even be inspired to give again! If yearly holiday appeals are the only time you contact your donors, chances are good that they aren’t feeling needed or cherished. So stay in touch—very close touch. Here’s how:Send AppealsWhen you first make the ask, let your supporters know why you need them. You can ask your donors to help in any way that they can and let them know how their help will lead to the achievement of your mission.Send Thank You NotesMake sure your thank you letter is timely and lets donors know what they can expect from your nonprofit in the future. Consider sending a second thank you note that asks for feedback and shows your continued appreciation. Send NewslettersNewsletters are a great way to describe what your organization has been doing. You can report on the impact of all donor contributions and help maintain your supporters’ interest. Don’t forget to remind your fans how important they are to you.RepeatRepeating this cycle of communication won’t annoy your supporters-it will make them feel involved in what you’re doing. To learn more about staying in touch with your supporters, check out our webinar Nonprofit 911: Turn First-Time Donors Into Repeat Donors with Tom Ahern and Jay Love.last_img read more

The Hottest Charity Fundraising Idea? Peer to Peer Giving!

first_imgThe Hottest Charity Fundraising Idea? Peer to Peer Giving! Peer to peer giving, or peer fundraising, is catching on like crazy because it’s a fun way for supporters to engage their friends with your cause, and it’s an easy way for them to help you raise money.What Makes Peer to Peer Giving So Popular?Peer fundraising has taken off because it is all done online and is largely carried out through social media. The most popular channels for peer fundraising are Facebook and Twitter, but LinkedIn, Google+, Instagram and Pinterest can all be used.Peer funding has become a more acceptable form of fundraising because the popularity of crowdfunding has taken away the stigma of asking for money. In the past, asking for money was sometimes a delicate subject, and by some, even considered to be rude. But, now it is perfectly acceptable to get on a soapbox and proclaim “I gave to this cause and I want you to do the same!” The beauty of the online venue is that anyone who wants to can respond with “Yes, I will,” but those who are unable to contribute or choose not to, simply don’t reply and are not put on the spot. There are no awkward excuses required, and no apologies necessary for asking.The peer to peer fundraising model garnered a lot of attention with the ice bucket challenge last summer. Each participant was encouraged to challenge their friends, so with each person adding two or three friends to the game, it grew quickly.The “yes I will” participate/donate is a great place for supporters to add the “and I challenge my friends to join me/match my donation,” etc. That’s where the fundraiser becomes peer to peer rather than just a challenge that you proclaim—and where the opportunity comes to reach new donors by connecting with your current donor’s networks.To learn more about peer fundraising, download our free eGuide, The Crowdfunding Craze. We also have specialists available to discuss how we can help you get the most out of your peer fundraising efforts, so contact us today or call 1-855-229-1694.last_img read more

Because You’re Awesome

first_imgTo our customers, our partners, our readers:  thank you for doing the good that you do.Every day we’re in awe of you.We’re so grateful for the amazing things that are accomplished by the nonprofits we work with: feeding the hungry, healing the sick, sheltering the homeless, saving animals, preserving the environment, fighting for justice, nurturing the arts, and so much more. Each day you are making the world a much brighter and more hopeful place with your passion and creativity. We know it’s not always easy, and we appreciate your dedication. We know that your work matters in a very real way to your communities and the lives that you impact. And this is why we come to work each day: to make it easier for you to focus on helping those that you serve.From all of us here at Network for Good, thank you. We are grateful for you and we wish you a very Happy Thanksgiving.last_img read more

3 Reasons to Develop a Middle Donor Program

first_imgThe word “middle” doesn’t always have the best connotation. From having “middle child syndrome” to being “middle of the road,” this word’s often associated with those things that are unfavorable or just plain innocuous.Another middle to add to this list is “middle donors.” These are the people who give your organization more than a typical annual gift, but not enough to warrant personal attention as a major gift prospect. Depending on your organization, those gifts can range anywhere from $500 to $50,000. It can be tricky to find the right balance of outreach and attention for this group of supporters, but I think it’s worth the time and effort to find that balance.Think about it this way: we all know the ubiquitous gift pyramid. Its design is based on perfect symmetry and alignment. Those middle stones are integral to the stability of the pyramid. That’s why developing a middle donor strategy is time well spent.There are three reasons why your organization should consider developing a middle donor program:Today’s Middle Donors = Tomorrow’s Major Donors? This group of donors is your pipeline to your future major gift donors. If you don’t have a donor giving circle, this is a good place to start. And if you do have some higher annual fund giving society, you are on the right track! A giving circle recognizes the higher annual investment of these donors by allowing them special access to your work through invitation-only events or special publications. Building those relationships now could lead to bigger donations in the future. They Are A Valuable Source of Regular Revenue: While every middle donor is not going to become a major gift prospect or donor, these donors have self-selected a higher level annual gift to your organization with relatively little effort. Retention rates among this donor group are usually higher than with smaller donors. So, just think about what potential may exist for increased annual revenue with a little more personalized level of communication about your work and special opportunities that deepen their connection. Inspire Others to Give More: Developing and promoting a middle donor program also gives smaller donors an incentive to upgrade their own giving. For some donors, knowing that they will get a distinct set of “benefits” and recognition in your annual report, on your website, and in other ways with a slightly bigger annual gift may just be the incentive they need to commit to a larger level of support.A middle donor program should feature manageable “benefits” for donors that celebrate their support at this level and provide them with special “access” to your leaders and programs. You also want to combine a higher-level communications calendar of electronic and print materials with some staff management.Your development staff who manage this program (can be one or two people depending on the size of the donors in this giving level), will be handle a larger portfolio of donors than their major gift colleagues. So they won’t be able to develop a personal relationship with every donor in this group. But they will prioritize the middle donors, make or coordinate personal solicitations for larger annual gifts, and capacity screen these donors to recommend who might be good major gift donor potential. This program is also a good way to involve volunteers who give at this level. You might think of appointing a chair and/or small (emphasis on small) committee whose charge is to solicit other middle donors to encourage the peer-to-peer solicitations.I think you’ll be amazed what a wonderful investment a middle donor program can be for your organization’s fundraising efforts.last_img read more

Why Non-Communicable Diseases Must Be Part of Any New Development Goals

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on September 19, 2012June 21, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)In a recent post on the Guardian’s Poverty Matters blog, Johanna Ralston, Chief Executive of the World Heart Federation, and Ann Keeling, Chief Executive of the International Diabetes Federation, argue that post-MDG development goals must include non-communicable diseases in order to see significant reductions in poverty and improvements in development.From the post:In 2000, world leaders drafting the millennium development goals (MDGs) addressed many of the great development challenges, but they made one serious mistake: they omitted any mention of NCDs, which together cause nearly two out of three deaths in the world (80% of those in developing countries).As the CEOs of the leading advocacy organisations fighting two of those NCDs, we believe this omission has resulted in a double whammy to NCDs – no attention, no funding – despite the fact that NCDs are overwhelmingly a poverty issue and related to all eight MDGs.“What gets measured, gets done,” says World Health Organisation director general Margaret Chan. But NCDs are not getting measured and therefore not “getting done”.Read the full post here.Share this:last_img read more

Snapshots of Gender and WASH Innovations in India

first_imgPosted on March 7, 2013June 21, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The following guest posts provide snapshots of the work of three recipients of Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation grants for work on innovative WASH and gender interventions in India.By Akhila Sivadas,Project Director, Center for Advocacy and Research, New Delhi: Rajasthani camp, a cluster of 600 households in South Delhi, is one of the 27 settlements where the Center for Advocacy and Research is facilitating the formation of Women’s’ Forums, which enable the community to collectively negotiate with the municipality for better sanitation services. Like all other settlements we have worked in, the women of Rajasthani Camp were frustrated with broken toilets, clogged drains, and garbage heaps in their community. The Women’s Forum launched a multi-pronged initiative this past fall. Armed with the community-specific disease data that emerged from a health conversation we convened, the Forum raised their concerns with a local leader who pressured authorities to fix the situation. Their persistence and determination has already paid off: toilet renovations are currently underway.By Sampath Kumor,Project Director, Rajiv Gandhi Charitable Trust, The Self Help Groups of Rajiv Gandhi Charitable Trust provide potent platforms to discuss and disseminate the objectives of the WASH and gender project. Women from socially and economically marginalized groups have now found a forum to discuss subjects that have always been disapproved and stigmatized. For communities with little choice but to defecate in the open, the process of identification of the risk and vulnerability of the same (particularly for adolescent girls) is a step closer towards the aim. In addition, targeted Self Help Groups for young women are utilizing peer-to-peer discussions to address menstrual hygiene management. The march is on!By Kathleen O’Reilly, Texas A&M University: In our research on successful sanitation habits in rural West Bengal and Himachal Pradesh, we have learned that using a toilet is so commonplace for mothers with young children that they often do not recognize the advantages gained by having a toilet. Despite casual replies to questions about the convenience of a household toilet, observation of mothers’ daily routines reveals that they take advantage of the toilet’s proximity by leaving children unattended when they use it. We have found that the toilet has become so useful and so habitual that women are no longer conscious of the burden it would be to take children with them for open defecation.For more in the WASH and Women’s Health blog series coordinated by WASH advocates, click here, or visit WASH Advocates.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Equipped With a Checklist: Bringing Postnatal Care to the Community

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on October 14, 2013June 12, 2017By: Allison Ettenger, Program Manager, Jacaranda HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Cross-posted from the Jacaranda Health blogJoyce*, a healthy mother, glows as she admires her new baby. Her husband  collects her belongings as she prepares to leave Jacaranda Maternity, and she hugs the community health worker who provided her discharge education: “See you in a few days,” she says. Most health care providers in Kenya – or across the developing world –would schedule a new mother’s six week postnatal visit, hope she returns for it, and call it a day. Jacaranda thinks otherwise.In the past decade there have been significant resources invested in pre-natal healthcare in resource-poor settings: expectant women are encouraged to attend four antenatal care visits, receive nutrition training, and are linked to malaria and HIV treatment. However, we have all too often ignored the most vulnerable part of the maternity experience: The postnatal period. Approximately 75% of neonatal deaths occur in the first week after delivery and in Kenya alone, 31 newborn deaths occur per 1,000 live births.It’s not as if the evidence for how to close this gap is lacking: Research from countries like Bangladesh, Ghana, Nepal and Malawi has shown that community-based early postpartum care in the first week after delivery has great potential to increase newborn survival and reduce death. Contact with trained health workers can improve early initiation of breastfeeding, thermal care, infection prevention and clean umbilical cord care – all practices that can save newborns’ lives. However, there are still too many babies dying in the few days after birth, and new mothers often find it difficult – if not impossible – to recognize danger signs when she takes her new baby home. If we can get hands-on education and care to women in the critical first few days after delivery, we can cut down on delays in seeking care and reduce the risk of newborn death.To continue reading, visit Jacaranda Health. Share this:last_img read more

More Caffeine, Less Long-Term Damage for Premature Infants?

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on May 22, 2014November 4, 2016By: Katie Millar, Technical Writer, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Caffeine can help us start our day or get us through a drowsy afternoon. But did you know caffeine can also help prevent a premature baby from having apneic spells, or periods of not breathing? Since 1977 we have known that pharmacological caffeine given to premature infants can help stimulate their immature brains and lungs to breath—preventing life threatening damage due to hypoxia, or lack of oxygen. This caffeine is usually given until the baby reaches 34 weeks gestation, or the time when the brains and lungs should be mature enough to breathe on their own.A recent study by Dr. Lawrence Rhein from Harvard Medical School and the Caffeine Pilot Study Group sought to evaluate if 34 weeks is really the best time to stop using caffeine. Dr. Rhein explained, “[34 weeks] is about that age that most babies stop having clinically obvious hypoxic spells. But the question has been, are there continued but less obvious episodes that we could and should be preventing? And can caffeine play a role in doing so?”What did the study find? Give the babies more caffeine. There are real, but less obvious, hypoxic spells after 34 weeks and giving caffeine to premature infants until 40 weeks, or term, gestation helps prevent them. The six week extension on administering caffeine prevented the hypoxic spells—or blood oxygen saturation levels below 90 percent. When blood oxygen levels were measured, babies in the extended caffeine treatment group experienced 52 percent less hypoxic spells and 47 percent less time under 90 percent oxygen saturation.Finding a healthy balance of oxygen levels for a premature infant is often a delicate science. While decreased oxygen can cause long term developmental morbidities and even death, supplemental oxygen and high oxygen saturation in the blood can also contribute to the development of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), which may lead to blindness. The findings for this study provide at least a partial solution to this difficult balance by showing that caffeine can help stabilize oxygen saturation levels.Moving forward more research is needed to evaluate the types and consequences of the less obvious hypoxic spells occurring after 34 weeks. “Our data showed that [hypoxic] episodes can continue for weeks after caffeine is discontinued,” Rhein said. “Those episodes were not clinically obvious, but we don’t yet know which episodes we need to react to. We’re setting the stage to ask whether some of the episodes that we don’t think are significant can affect long-term cognitive development.” The answers to these questions have implications for both the future of the premature infant and family.If the hypoxic spells do affect long-term cognitive development, then treatment through extended caffeine has implications for improving outcomes and decreasing the need of special education services and health care costs to the family.Adapted from two articles—one in Vector, Boston Children’s Hospital’s science and clinical innovation blog and the other in news from Harvard Medical School.Do you have thoughts or insight on the effects of neonatal hypoxia? How your facility addresses neonatal hypoxia? Do you use caffeine? If not, why not? If you are interested in submitting a blog post on neonatal hypoxia, please email Katie Millar.Share this:last_img read more

What You Need to Know about Giving Season

first_imgWhile many of us are still cleaning up from Labor Day barbeques and dragging ourselves out of a summer haze, let me wake you up with this sledge hammer:#GivingTuesday is less than 90 days away.30% of all nonprofit giving happens during the last month of the year, from #GivingTuesday through December 31. It’s a time when donors are in the mood to be generous, and even the smallest nonprofits have a chance to boost their bottom lines and get the dollars they need to fuel their missions in the coming calendar year. Here at Network for Good, we want to make sure you get your piece of the pie.Here’s a basic timeline of what you should be doing in the months ahead:September – Warm up your donors, plan your campaign, and make sure you have the tools you need to be successful.October – Write your appeals, continue to get ready, and keep your donors engaged with various communications that call their attention to your mission.November – Kick off your campaign on #GivingTuesday (November 28).December – Keep the momentum going with percent-to-goal updates, thank the donors who have already given, and push hard to December 30 and 31 (the biggest giving days of the year).January – Thank your donors, and develop a rock-solid retention plan to keep your supporters enthused and engaged throughout the year.What’s first?Right now, it’s time to focus on creating the best campaign for your organization. This means setting appropriate goals (both dollar goals and non-financial ones), getting your team in place, and making sure your nonprofit is equipped with the right technology to get the job done.Become a Network for Good customer now to take advantage of all our year-end customer benefits including:Easy to use Donor Management Software with email, direct mail, peer to peer and so much more all in one systemEligibility for cash prizes on #GivingTuesday.Exclusive End-of-Year eGuide for customers only.Exposure to new donors with a listing on our #GivingTuesday microsite.Inclusion in our Retention Wednesday activities (more to come).Templated emails and appeals built right into your donor management system.As the season progresses, check back for more tips, downloads and webinars to keep your year-end campaign on track.last_img read more