Leggat takes another Terex

first_imgThe addition of the 130-tonne capacity crane, which has a 60 m main boom and maximum system length of 86.5 m, brings the total number of Terex cranes in the Leggat fleet to seven.The Terex Explorer 5500 was chosen by Leggat due to its compact size and versatility, allowing it to operate effectively in space-restricted areas.Leggat will use the crane for a variety of applications ranging from housing and bridges to demolition and machinery installations.  www.terex.comwww.leggatplant.co.uklast_img read more

Creating awareness about men’s health

first_imgCameron February and son Justin from Athlone. June is Men’s Health Awareness Month, and it will strike a special chord with Cameron February, from Athlone, who was diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 49. His journey started in 2011 when he noticed a fluid coming out of his left breast, after his son, Justin, 15, knocked his head against his chest. A year later, in 2012, he noticed a lump in the same breast. Mr February went for a biopsy in March that year, and the results came back negative. However, in May, he decided to have the lump removed at Melomed Hospital in Mitchell’s Plain, because it worried him.“The surgeon, however, did not remove the lump but removed fat under the nipple, and sent it for tests. The results came back and said I have 1.2 millimetres of cancer,” said Mr February. He was given a letter to take to Groote Schuur Hospital for treatment.“I was so shocked and devastated. I thought I would never see my son again. I felt like my life came to an end,” he said.On Monday May 28, he had his first breast scan to see how far the cancer had spread. He then consulted with his cousin, Marc Combrinck, who is a professor in neurology at Groote Schuur. Together with his colleague, Professor Eugene Panieri, the pair decided that it was best to have his left breast removed. About a week later, on Thursday June 7, Mr February underwent the procedure and started with chemotherapy on Monday July 2.“People say the chemotherapy will make you nauseous, but it didn’t make me nauseous at all. On the second session, however, my hair started falling out, and so I decided to shave it all off.”Later that year, in September, he went for another chemotherapy session and another in October.“I felt very weak, I was also going through a divorce at the time and was unemployed, but I had many people supporting me.”In November, Mr February started his radiation treatment, going every day for three weeks. He continued to go for check-ups every six months after that.“My hair started growing back in 2013, and I felt human again. My teeth, however, became very weak. One day, I bit on a chicken bone and my tooth cracked in half. I had to have a root canal done, but that didn’t last, so I went for an implant instead.”Mr February still goes for regular check-ups every six months and now enjoys yoga and transcendental meditation.“My message to men out there is to go and get tested if you notice anything is wrong. Don’t wait till the last minute. I know men don’t like to get tested. Don’t keep quiet about it either, talk to your partners about it. Know what is happening in your bodies.” In January this year, he started the Braveheart Foundation. The idea is to create cancer awareness among men and give them support, although he has yet to launch the foundation. Mr February’s last check-up will be in June next year. If all goes well, he will be cancer free for five years.last_img read more

Estancia residents banned from entering Concepcion

first_img“Ako worried kay ti naga-transaction kami sa Estancia kag nagadala sang isda. Ang taga-Estancia nagabakal man sang isda sa amon,” according to Banias. “(T)hese two positive cases were not immediately quarantined as required by the health protocol on COVID-19 and continued to circulate in Estancia and unnecessarily exposed themselves to others,” read part of Banias’ EO. Mayor Raul Banias of Concepcion ordered a weeklong travel ban in an Aug. 3 Executive Order (EO) No. 46 after the local government unit of Estancia confirmed having two cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The Estancia travel ban took effect on Aug 3. * 56-year-old male or Patient No. 1307, a locally stranded individual (LSI) who returned to Estancia on July 19 from Metro Manila; he was a personal aide of Requinto The need to protect the people of Concepcion from the possibility of local transmission – if people from Estancia continue to enter the town – has become “urgent”, he stressed. He told Dr. Sumile, “Meantime nga wala pa kamo nakatapos contacttracing kag wala pa kita result sang test, indi lang anay pagpasudlon ang taga-Estancia sa amon banwa.” ILOILO – If you are from Estancia town, do not enter the nearby municipality of Concepcion. You are barred. “I-lift naton as soon nga makatapos sila contact trace and makagwa ang resulta,” said Banias. “(T)his is a public health situation that can potentially become a super spreader event if not handled appropriately and swiftly,” said Banias.center_img He placed the police and LGU staff manning Concepcion’s border checkpoints on “heightened alert and surveillance to prevent the breach of our borders by people from Estancia.” Banias’ EO, however, exempted “authorized persons in the performance of duties” such as military and police personnel, local officials, and medical workers. “This is a public health situation that can potentially become a super spreader event if not handled appropriately and swiftly,” says Mayor Raul Banias of Concepcion, Iloilo. The two COVID cases in Estancia worked for Mayor Melina Requinto. They were the following: * 33-year-old male or Patient No. 1355, personal driver of Requinto According to Banias, a physician, he was able to discuss the situation with Estancia’s Municipal Health Officer, Dr. Greg Rolan Sumile. Patient No. 1355 fetched Patient 1307 at Fort San Pedro in Iloilo City on July 19. On Monday, Aug. 3, the municipal hall of Estancia town closed its doors to the public for five days for disinfection./PNlast_img read more

From ‘stalker’ to ‘walker’: Woman gets dream job as zombie

first_img In this June 12, 2018 photo, zombie Terrie Hamrick poses for a photo in Haralson, Ga. Hamrick’s dream of being a “walker” for “The Walking Dead” came true two seasons ago when she was cast as an extra by AMC, the company that produces the critically acclaimed television series. The show, based on graphic novels, features a group of people fighting to survive a zombie apocalypse. (AP Photo/Brinley Hineman) 1 of 2 In this June 12, 2018 photo, zombie Terrie Hamrick poses for a photo near the silos made famous by “The Walking Dead” in Haralson, Ga. Hamrick’s dream of being a “walker” for “The Walking Dead” came true two seasons ago when she was cast as an extra by AMC, the company that produces the critically acclaimed television series. The show, based on graphic novels, features a group of people fighting to survive a zombie apocalypse. (AP Photo/Brinley Hineman) “Since the show started, I told my children, ‘I want to be a walker,’” said Hamrick, 68, who added that she never really believed the dream that has been at the top of her bucket list since 2012 would become reality.She’s one of the 15 regular walkers and even has her own outfit on the set labeled with her name that she wears while filming, she said. The days are grueling: 14 hours — sometimes longer — in the Georgia heat.The show has filmed in Senoia, about 35 miles (55 kilometers) south of Atlanta, and nearby Haralson since 2012.Hamrick proudly acknowledges that she was one of the original “walker stalkers” — extreme fans who hang out by the show’s set. She became so well known around the set that Michael Rooker, who plays Merle Dixon, warmly called her his “little walker stalker,” and Andrew Lincoln, who plays lead character Sheriff Rick Grimes, would point to her whenever he saw her in the distance, Hamrick said.Despite her newfound fame, Hamrick hasn’t quit her other day job: working as a walker for a tour company in Haralson that brings “The Walking Dead” to life for fans. The owner of The Walkin Dead Haralson Tours and Events, Jamie Thompson, scouts locations in Senoia and Haralson for the show.While in Senoia, production is filmed on sets, but in Haralson, they film on lots, Thompson said. On the tour, fans are guided by a man playing the part of Daryl Dixon, one of the show’s most popular characters, and get to relive moments from the series.That’s where Hamrick comes in. She makes her entrance in bloody zombie makeup, both terrorizing and delighting those on the tour.One minute she’s snarling, ready to devour them. Moments later, she transforms into her grandmotherly self, laughing and taking photos with fans.Less than 5 feet (150 centimeters) tall — she officially measures 4 feet, 10-and-a-half inches (147 centimeters), she said, stressing the importance of that extra half-inch — she’s doesn’t seem at all threatening. But once artist Michelle Molanari transforms her into a gory monster, fans on the streets of Senoia certainly are cautious as they approach, many uttering under their breath, “It looks so real.”“Miss Terrie is a tiny, gentle, soft-spoken grandmother who’s always ready with a kind word about everyone,” Molanari said.Between the series and daily Haralson tours, she’s hooked on the buzz of the entertainment industry.“It’s exciting for me to see myself on there,” Hamrick said. “The show is great, the actors are great, this place is great.”Hamrick even has her own fans now. She recently created a Facebook fan page, where she posts photos of the cast and behind-the-scenes shots of the tours. Within a week, it had nearly 1,000 likes.“People mob you wanting pictures,” she said. “It’s so exciting.” ATLANTA | When she’s not spending time with her grandchildren, Terrie Hamrick is likely dressed as a zombie.Hamrick’s dream of being a “walker” for “The Walking Dead” came true two seasons ago when she was cast as an extra by AMC, the company that produces the critically acclaimed television series. The show, based on graphic novels, features a group of people fighting to survive a zombie apocalypse.last_img read more

Hoosier Uplands Senior Fair June 9 in Paoli

first_imgHoosier Uplands announces their Senior Citizens Health and Information Fair will be held Tuesday, June 9 at the Paoli Community Center at 1075 North Sandy Hook Road.Doors will open at 9 a.m. with various exhibitors, health screenings and a dance from 1 p.m. till 2:30 p.m. with music performed by Classic Country.Lunch will be provided but is limited to persons 50 years old and older. However to receive the free lunch you must pre-register by calling Hoosier Uplands at (812) 849-4457 or (800) 333-2451. Persons with hearing/speech disabilities can call GTS’s TRS at (800) 743-3333. Door prizes have been donated by area businesses. Participants who come to the fair will be registered to win. You must be present to claim your prize.For more information contact Hoosier Uplands and ask for Barbara or Trudy.last_img read more