Push Comes To Shove: The New Way We Interact With Information

first_imgA Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… peter yared Related Posts Tags:#Facebook#Google Now#PubNub#Pull Computing#push notifications#Simple Notification Service#Siri Guest author Peter Yared is co-founder and CTO at the push-notification startup Sapho.Since its inception in the 1960s, the modern computer has offered humans the same “pull computing” paradigm: make a query, get a response. Or, as we often experience it: Go to the haystack, try to find the needle.But that’s quickly changing. As software grows more intelligent and learns more about our preferences and behavior, it seemingly gets to know us. That knowledge makes software more valuable because it means that it can deliver things to us, perhaps even before we know we want it. We are at the start of the era of push computing.Pushmi-PullyuWith push computing, a computer is no longer just a question-and-answer service; it’s expected to proactively figure out what’s interesting to you and deliver that data. On mobile, that’s often an actionable stream of cards and timely notifications of important items.Push computing represents a major shift in architecture from the pull relationship computers have long maintained with users. Computing interfaces have evolved from green screens to GUIs to HTML5 to apps, but most applications have the same workflows and address the same needs in a pull-based fashion.Outside the view of users, however, software delivery has steadily evolved toward a push-type model. Just consider how far we’ve come, from the hosted timesharing of mainframes and minicomputers to dedicated Unix servers to the PC floppy disk and CD and finally to the increasingly prevalent “software-as-a-service” we see today.Over the past few years, push computing has also begun to infiltrate the interfaces of key consumer apps. Of course, as Chris Dixon recently pointed out, some Internet services are further along than others. Facebook, for instance, has mastered intelligent news feeds of cards and relevant notifications while Twitter delivers a straight temporal stream that grows more overwhelming the more accounts you follow.Don’t Push MeNot all pushes are the same, after all, and companies have to think carefully about the information that is important to push, when and why it‘s pushed, and how they expect users to react.Major players are also trying to figure out how to make push a central part of the mobile OS. As I wrote a few months ago, Google is aggressively recasting itself as a push player with Google Now and answer cards in search. Apple is decidedly in the pull camp, as Siri is rarely proactive, although the iOS notification manager is well ahead of Android’s. Push has also become the backbone of successful mobile apps powered by real time infrastructure such as PubNub and Amazon’s Simple Notification Service.Machine learning is key to the success of contemporary push-based services. Notifications and cards should only presented to users if they deliver relevant information users can act on easily.Previous attempts to provide user notifications via email failed because email notifications are typically irrelevant and spammy. We’re all well trained to avoid spam like the plague, so users typically dumped all notifications into an email folder and never looked at them at all. Email is also inherently less actionable because a user has to click on a link, log into an application, and then perform an action.For push to work, it’s crucial for applications to make their notifications actionable, friction-free, and rooted in sophisticated machine learning. Early efforts like PointCast to push information were too static and overloaded networks with continual updates.Getting Pushy At WorkWhile push got its start in the consumer realm, the case for business-based push is in many ways much stronger. Enterprise systems manage discrete events that often require urgent action. For example, a sales opportunity might be closing in a CRM system, a complaint from a customer you cover could pop up in the service system, or the HR database could flag you about a new hire you need to onboard.Conversely, the relative importance of events in consumer apps are much more nebulous. To deliver a superior experience to users, Google Now must continually learn, confirm and re-confirm details about where you live, where you work, your calendar, your travel arrangements, your preferences. Peoples’ lives and environs are constantly shifting, making it hard for the new generation of consumer apps to keep up.What is more difficult about enterprise events is that they must be extremely secure and the data is often locked away in a variety of data siloes.As users increasingly expect their services to be intelligent and proactive, push computing is making its way not just to mobile, but also to desktops and laptops by means of browser notifications. The new generation of push software is ushering in a new way for humans to interact with technology, and in the case of the Internet of Things, for technology to interact with itself in the form of networks of “smart” devices.But as digital data becomes more voluminous, our systems have to get more intelligent. They have to filter, analyze, and deliver information to users—and then only when they need to know it or act on it. The goal should always be simple: for the haystack to bring you the needle—whatever it is—before you even start to look for it.Lead photo by james moorecenter_img Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

Percassi: ‘Atalanta can’t afford Zlatan’

first_imgPresident Antonio Percassi said Atalanta are too “poor” to bring Zlatan Ibrahimovic to Bergamo, but claimed they are “expecting to qualify” for the next phase of the Champions League. La Dea have rocketed to the top of Italian football these last few years, but the President said they are still “grounded” and yet ambition, despite picking up one point from the first four Champions League games. “We expect to advance in the Champions League,” Percassi told news agency ANSA at the inauguration of the Mino Favini Academy. “The second half against Manchester City was amazing, that’s why we believe in it.” The news about Ibrahimovic leaving MLS has sparked an interest from a host of Italian clubs, linking Napoli, Milan and Bologna to the player. Percassi won’t entertain any rumours of the Swedish star moving to Bergamo, though. “Ibrahimovic is a great player, but we can’t afford him,” the 66-year-old added. “We are mere paupers… “We don’t have the revenue of the big clubs, although miraculously we get the results and remain a provincial reality keeping our feet on the ground. “We can’t compete with certain figures. We’ve got clear ideas regarding the stadium and have to complete the Zingonia training centre. We still need some millions and we have already spent €4m on the Bortolotti Center.” He might free up some spending money if he decides to sell Dejan Kulusevski, who has been attracting interest after his performances at Parma this season, but the President doesn’t seem to be in a rush. “We will evaluate at the end of the season, and we will do it on our own terms.” Before facing Dinamo Zagreb in the Champions League, Atalanta must prepare to face Juventus in Serie A when they are back in action after the international break. “They will be two great matches, since they are two great teams,” he said. “It’s important to have [Duvan] Zapata back, we have missed him.” Watch Serie A live in the UK on Premier Sports for just £11.99 per month including live LaLiga, Eredivisie, Scottish Cup Football and more. Visit: https://subscribe.premiersports.tv/last_img read more

In jest: Hitting a ball

first_imgThe thing to do is to excel at something – anything – and you have it made. If you can put a rubber ball into a hole often enough, you are a golf champion. And you can have all you want. Or take a shuttlecock. If you can place it,The thing to do is to excel at something – anything – and you have it made. If you can put a rubber ball into a hole often enough, you are a golf champion. And you can have all you want. Or take a shuttlecock. If you can place it in the opponent’s court smartly enough, and often enough, you are great.And once you have done it, there is no prize beyond your grasp.You might be a clerk in a bank. You have suddenly acquired the status of an executive, and three promotions to boot.And the Government will give you a plot of land free so that you can build a house on it for yourself and your lady-love.And you’ll be taken in victory processions, with the politicians in tow, for you are a hero-to your native soil and your country.What nostalgia you evoke! The country’s sports writers will dip their pens in syrup, and say how great you are. No more the vitriolic prose. It’s rainbows all the way.And all because you can put a ball in a hole or a shuttlecock across the net.And there are the poor sods who slog and get nowhere – and stay clerks.This is so not merely in a capitalist society; the communists overreach themselves in doing you proud – if you have skill with a ball or a shuttlecock. You are made a hero of the Order of Lenin or something, and you get a flat – more precious than gold in Moscow – and a sleek imported car and the foreign currency coupons that entitle you to shop in foreigners’ stores instead of queuing up for food and drink.advertisementThe learned men are fools to spend a lifetime acquiring knowledge out of tomes.Much better to know how to hit a ball or a shuttlecock and win laurels for yourself and your country.Doesn’t it prove that life is cock-eyed? Someone called Shakespeare once said something to the effect that men and women are only players on a stage. Amen.last_img read more

How to get your message out

first_imgWe write a lot about how to inspire supporters with compelling stories and clear calls to action, but even the most well-crafted messages are worthless if no one sees them. In addition to your outreach via email marketing or direct mail, it’s equally important to ensure your cause is well-represented through press outreach, social media, and search. Tomorrow, Network for Good is hosting afree webinar for nonprofits to learn more about effective publicity tactics from our friends at PR NewsChannel. This is a great opportunity to get your questions answered and pick up some practical PR tips from the pros, just in time to put them into place for your fall events and year-end fundraising campaigns.Register now for the live webinar on Tuesday, July 30 at 1pm ET. (If you can’t attend the event at that time, go ahead and register — you’ll receive an email with the playback recording of the session, plus the slides.)last_img read more

How to Turn Donors into Fundraisers

first_imgWant to add new donors and more donations to your fundraising results this year?One of the best ways to expand your reach and attract new supporters is by tapping into the networks of your existing supporters with a peer-to-peer fundraising campaign. Here’s why: people are more likely to give when asked by a friend or family member, and thanks to the multiplier effect, these supporter-fundraisers will increase their lifetime value to your organization by giving and bringing new donations to your cause.So, how do you do it? How do you inspire donors to create personalized fundraising campaigns and raise money on your behalf? Here are 11 tips for turning donors into fundraisers.Make it easy.First and foremost, you must make setting up a peer fundraising page and asking friends to donate dead simple to do. The same rules apply for getting donors to give as they do for getting supporters to ask their networks to give to your cause. The easier it is to do, the more likely they will be to do it. Focus on removing any roadblocks for your supporters-turned-fundraisers.Offer portable outreach. Arm your supporters with pre-written emails and social media posts. Provide grab-and-go templates so your advocates can focus on reaching out to their friends.Be clear. Make sure you are clear on what you’re asking your supporters to do when you recruit them to be fundraisers. Make your instructions short and simple. If there are too many steps or complex requests, they’ll get confused and give up. Simplify their part of the process as much as possible, and if you can do some of the steps for them, even better.Be realistic. You want your goals to be exciting and motivating, but requests don’t feel do-able will just turn potential fundraisers off. Make your ask feel possible so your supporters can see they can succeed and make an impact for your work. If possible, share other fundraisers’ good results to illustrate that a successful campaign is achievable.Have the right tools. Having the right software in place makes these types of social fundraising campaigns a lot easier for you, and your fundraisers. Focus on tools that empower supporters, offer built-in sharing options, and make your fundraisers look good. Schedule a personalized tour of Network for Good’s peer-to-peer fundraising software and learn how you can easily create campaigns that will extend your reach and attract new donors.Make it relevant.Giving back is often very personal, for both donors and fundraisers alike. Reinforce this important tie to your work by making the idea of fundraising for your organization tailored to your supporters.Think about their connection with your cause. Some donors have an affinity for certain projects or programs, or they have a story that shares a unique perspective. When asking supporters to join as fundraisers, make sure you connect these preferences to the campaign you’d like them to help spread. If a donor has always supported your senior meal delivery program, tap them to start a fundraiser to help fund a new van to distribute even more meals.Personalize your request. Use the details you have in your donor database to personalize your invitation to participate. Yes, start with getting their name correct on the emails, but also include relevant details about their history with your organization and how this makes them the perfect fit for your fundraising team. A request that seems generic or worse, disconnected, won’t inspire donors to get involved.Make it about the impact.Everyone wants to know they’re making a difference, and your fundraisers are no exception. Get your advocates on board by illustrating the impact that their efforts will have.Show the big picture. Give prospective fundraisers a clear view of how their efforts will add to your bigger goal. What is the vision that your campaign will make a reality? Paint a picture of how your supporter-fundraisers will make a difference and include this in your recruitment communications.But also get specific. Now that you’ve set the vision, break down what each campaign, donor, and donation can do. This will help fundraisers and donors alike understand how they can achieve the goals you’ve set, one step at a time. Will $20 help feed a family for a day? Does a $2,000 fundraiser goal equal a new refrigerator for your food pantry? Let supporters know exactly how their gifts will be used so they can visualize their specific impact.Make it fun.Social fundraising campaigns can create a deeper connection with your supporters … and they’re fun! Don’t forget to use this fact when you recruit and motivate fundraisers for your projects.Leave room for personalization and creativity. Give your fundraisers ownership over their campaigns and allow them to customize their communications and fundraising pages with their photos, stories, and video. Not only does this make their efforts feel more personal, these individual touches will make donors more likely to give as it evokes their recognition and relationship with the fundraiser.Offer motivation. Keep your supporters going with updates on how the campaign is going and how their contributions are adding up. Check in with encouraging words and tips for making their outreach more effective. Don’t forget: a little competition among your fundraisers is healthy and can drive extra participation. Consider offering an incentive for the best campaigns or when fundraisers meet certain milestones.Create goals and deadlines. While you want your goals to be realistic (see above), you do want to set some targets and track milestones to help motivate your fundraisers and drive a sense of urgency. This helps your supporters stay engaged and can spur them on to encourage more donations.Network for Good’s peer fundraising software will help you do all of these things and more. You can create beautiful campaigns that inspire donors to fundraise on your behalf and motivate their networks to give to your organization.last_img read more

Research Council of Norway Announces New Funding Opportunity for FP and MNCH

first_imgPosted on August 2, 2013February 16, 2017By: Kate Mitchell, Manager of the MHTF Knowledge Management System, Women and Health InitiativeClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The Global Health and Vaccination Research Program (GLOBVAC) has recently announced a global health funding opportunity that will give priority to research on family planning as well as maternal, neonatal, and child health. The group has announced up to NOK 244 million for research in these areas. From the Research Council of Norway:Family planning, reproductive, maternal, neonatal, child and youth health are relevant topics for the new priority. All relevant health aspects are covered, including nutrition and child development. An important aspect is the follow-up of the recommendations of the  UN Commission on Life-Saving Commodities for Women and Children. Encourage collaboration with low and middle-income countries International collaboration is highly encouraged in the call. Collaborations and partnerships with highly qualified international groups, including partnerships with research groups and institutions in low and middle-income countries are strongly encouraged. Relevance for the health-related United Nations Millennium Development Goals, i.e. child and maternal health and communicable diseases, as well as other major global health endeavours, is of overarching importance to GLOBVAC. Priorities for this call: 1. Prevention and treatment of, and diagnostics for, communicable diseases with particular relevance for low and lower-middle income countries. 2. Prevention and treatment of, and diagnostics for, neglected tropical diseases. 3. Family planning, reproductive, maternal, neonatal, child and youth health. 4. Health systems and health policy research. 5. Implementation research. 6. Innovation in technology and methods development for maternal and child health in settings where appropriate technologies are not available or non-existing. The application deadline is 4 September 2013.Learn more about this opportunity.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Innovative Methods of Delivering Antenatal Care: A Policy Dialogue

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on July 21, 2014November 2, 2016By: Katie Millar, Technical Writer, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Antenatal care has long been viewed as a critical component of comprehensive maternal and newborn health care, together with care at the time of delivery and during the postnatal period. Yet, in low-income countries, only 38% of pregnant women attended the recommended four or more ANC visits during 2006-2013. Since numerous life-saving interventions can be delivered in the weeks and months leading up to birth, what is holding the global maternal health community back from successfully delivering high quality ANC to all pregnant women around the world? Further, what does high quality ANC actually entail? What innovative models for delivering ANC exist, and might be scaled up to reach more women in more settings?To begin to answer these questions—and their policy implications—the MHTF recently worked together with the Wilson Center, as part of the Advancing dialogue on maternal health, series to facilitate the policy dialogue, “Delivering Quality Antenatal Care in Low Resource Settings: Examining Innovative Models and Planning For Scale up.”The panel for this policy dialogue consisted of Dr. A. Metin Gülmezolgu of the World Health Organization (WHO), Carrie Klima, PhD of the University of Illinois at Chicago, and Faith Muigai of Jacaranda Health. The three experts on this panel offered insight into both gaps and solutions to the current ANC environment. Their expertise focused around three main topics: continued rigorous research, creating more effective and efficient models of care, and delivering quality care through investing in the health workforce.ResearchGlobal standards for ANC have experienced numerous iterations, and the World Health Organization (WHO) continues to examine the best schedule and content for ANC. The second iteration of WHO’s ANC model, Focused Antenatal Care (FANC), was released in 2001 and outlines key interventions to be delivered in four visits that are critically timed. But a WHO trial in Zimbabwe showed an increase in perinatal death, specifically fetal deaths, in those who had only four ANC visits.This model is currently under reevaluation by the WHO and we can look forward to new guidelines in the coming year.Dr. Gülmezolgu emphasized the continual need of rigorous research like randomized control trials (RCTs) to evaluate two questions—what should be delivered and how. This is being accomplished partially through the joint WHO and MHTF project, Adding Content to Contact, which systematically assesses the obstacles that prevent and the factors that enable the adoption and implementation of cost-effective interventions for antenatal and postnatal care along the care continuum. Research and interventions for ensuring a healthy pregnancy and delivery should occur on several levels: individual interventions, barriers and facilitators to access to and provision of care, large-scale program evaluation to address policy issues, and health systems interventions. The outcomes of these interventions and research are not only maternal, but should also be evaluated on the fetal and neonatal level and women-centered—creating a space where women can learn about pregnancy and not just preventing complications.Innovative Models of CarePublic facilities in low-income countries are often overcrowded with poor provider-to-patient ratios, straining health workers and providing a barrier to sufficient ANC. Carrie Klima offers insight to a model of care that could improve the efficiency and effectiveness of health workers in low-resource settings. CenteringPregnancy is a group care model that has been implemented in the Unites States since the 1990s. In CenteringPregnancy, eight to 12 pregnant women with similar due dates receive their prenatal care, education, and support in a group setting. This model has shown an increase in weight and gestational age for mothers who deliver prematurely. But could this model, primarily used in a developed country, also work in the developing world?Recently Klima traveled to Tanzania and Malawi to conduct a feasibility and acceptability study of this model of care. The current CenteringPregnancy model of ten visits and was pared down to four to reflect the FANC guidelines for this study. What did the results show? Both health workers and expecting mothers were accepting of this model and qualitatively reported an increase in the quality of ANC. Midwives reported that they finally felt like they were able to practice their profession as they were taught to do in midwifery school. Women were also taught how to perform self-assessments and reported feeling more empowered by better understanding the metrics of their care and options for treatment.Invest in the Health WorkforceJacaranda Health in Kenya provides a novel model of care not often seen in low-resource settings—quality over quantity, a valued health workforce versus one that is overworked. This health model has six areas of focus: patient-centered design, human resources, quality improvement, technology, measuring impact, and business innovation. Faith Muigai, Director of Clinical Operations, stressed the importance of supply-side incentives for ANC as she highlighted patient-centered interventions. During their stay at the facility women receive three meals, two snacks, medications, maternity pads, and other goods that the woman or her family normally must supply. At Jacaranda facilities, patients keep coming back because the quality is much better. Jacaranda also works with women to create a savings plan for delivery fees. Since some women can’t afford these fees, Jacaranda is working with the Government of Kenya to subsidize care and lower prices.Jacaranda not only creates a quality place to receive care, but also a quality place to provide care. Jacaranda is passionate about their health workforce and has developed a career ladder for their staff to help create a sustainable health system. This allows task-shifting, which maximizes time with clients so education can be provided. Muigai concluded by emphasizing that the model of care Jacaranda implements is “a means of proving concepts that impact the delivery of cost-effective, patient-centered, quality care in low-resource settings.”Interested in learning more about what our speakers had to say? Follow the links below:New Security Beat: Antenatal Care as an Instrument of Change: Innovative Models for Low-Resource SettingsDr. A. Metin Gülmezoglu’s PresentationCarrie Klima’s PresentationFaith Muigai’s PresentationFriday Podcast With Faith MuigaiPhoto GalleryVideoInterested in learning more about the MHTF’s ongoing work relating to antenatal care? Contact Annie Kearns, project manager of Adding Content to Contact (ACC).Share this:last_img read more

Part 2: The Continuum of Care: Call the Midwife

first_imgIn our first blog, Esther is faced with two issues: a) accessing information (long queues at the clinic) and b) accessing commodities (pregnancy test). Now, she is 31 weeks pregnant and though she’s been to the clinic twice, she still doesn’t know exactly what to do when the big day comes. And what if something strange happens before then? Should she call the midwife? Someone else? And how will she get to the clinic? What if there’s an emergency?She could really use some of the innovative services that are available in other countries, such asWomen’s groups in Bangladesh, India, Nepal and Malawi that discuss and find solutions to help improve maternal and child healthFather’s groups in Spain helping ensure that immigrants have access to servicesMaternity voucher schemes in IndiaMobile phones in Ghana that remind women of their appointments or their medication scheduleHealth promotion groups to encourage antenatal care uptake or address societal issues where the mother-in-law is the main decision-makerLow-cost, locally supported means of transportation such as ambulances, boats, cars, bikes or donkey carts in ZambiaEducation on nutrition and breastfeedingFree services such as China’s free postnatal care home serviceBut Esther also needs the health system to support her by providing quality services along the continuum of care throughout her pregnancy – from home to the clinic. To do this well, health care providers need to know Esther and understand her circumstances. They need to be able to provide the continuum of care as a team, integrating antenatal care with labour services and postnatal care, and providing that care as close as possible to Esther.The Manoshi project, for example, brought that level of care into the slum areas of Bangladesh. The project reduced the famous ”three delays” by providing solid health information on when referral might be necessary, keeping transportation means on stand-by, and dedicating staff to speed women through administrative requirements to facilitate access to emergency maternal and newborn care (EmONC) at the hospital.Midwife-led CareAn existing model of care that is gaining traction in countries like Esther’s is the midwife-led unit. Midwives are able to provide effective comprehensive care from pre-pregnancy through pregnancy, birth and the postnatal period. Setting up a midwife-led unit with a waiting home and close to a hospital means that women can easily access midwifery services throughout pregnancy and childbirth and, if needed, can be seamlessly transferred to next level care or EmONC services. To provide true continuum of care the midwife must be able to call on an obstetrician and the hospital at any time and be part of an integrated team of health care providers, associates and lay health workers that reach from the community to the hospital and keeps the woman and newborn at the center of care.Setting up such collaborative teams of providers requires quality education of all groups and effective regulation that supports and promotes their collaboration and integration. Providers also need continuing professional development, clear career pathways, and a regulatory environment that allows the provision of appropriate skill mix at all levels of the system.In the midwife-led unit, Esther, as a new mum, would also obtain information on postnatal care along with her newborn’s care: exclusive breastfeeding, basic hygiene, infection control, cord care, etc. Because the midwife has taken care of Esther from beginning to end, she will be familiar with her circumstances at home and can ensure that effective follow-up care is provided in her community.When asked, women made clear what they need for a healthy pregnancy. First, women feel that information and education are essential to allow them to learn for themselves. Also, they need to know and understand the organisation of services and receive care that is respectful and given by staff who engender trust, personalized to meet their individual needs, and offered by care providers who are kind. Making midwife-led units available is an effective way to increase the capacity of the health system, cover the needs of the population, contain costs, and increase user satisfaction. Midwife-led care is more than a simple win-win.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:,In our first blog, Esther is faced with two issues: a) accessing information (long queues at the clinic) and b) accessing commodities (pregnancy test). Now, she is 31 weeks pregnant and though she’s been to the clinic twice, she still doesn’t know exactly what to do when the big day comes. And what if something strange happens before then? Should she call the midwife? Someone else? And how will she get to the clinic? What if there’s an emergency?She could really use some of the innovative services that are available in other countries, such asWomen’s groups in Bangladesh, India, Nepal and Malawi that discuss and find solutions to help improve maternal and child healthFather’s groups in Spain helping ensure that immigrants have access to servicesMaternity voucher schemes in IndiaMobile phones in Ghana that remind women of their appointments or their medication scheduleHealth promotion groups to encourage antenatal care uptake or address societal issues where the mother-in-law is the main decision-makerLow-cost, locally supported means of transportation such as ambulances, boats, cars, bikes or donkey carts in ZambiaEducation on nutrition and breastfeedingFree services such as China’s free postnatal care home serviceBut Esther also needs the health system to support her by providing quality services along the continuum of care throughout her pregnancy – from home to the clinic. To do this well, health care providers need to know Esther and understand her circumstances. They need to be able to provide the continuum of care as a team, integrating antenatal care with labour services and postnatal care, and providing that care as close as possible to Esther.The Manoshi project, for example, brought that level of care into the slum areas of Bangladesh. The project reduced the famous ”three delays” by providing solid health information on when referral might be necessary, keeping transportation means on stand-by, and dedicating staff to speed women through administrative requirements to facilitate access to emergency maternal and newborn care (EmONC) at the hospital.Midwife-led CareAn existing model of care that is gaining traction in countries like Esther’s is the midwife-led unit. Midwives are able to provide effective comprehensive care from pre-pregnancy through pregnancy, birth and the postnatal period. Setting up a midwife-led unit with a waiting home and close to a hospital means that women can easily access midwifery services throughout pregnancy and childbirth and, if needed, can be seamlessly transferred to next level care or EmONC services. To provide true continuum of care the midwife must be able to call on an obstetrician and the hospital at any time and be part of an integrated team of health care providers, associates and lay health workers that reach from the community to the hospital and keeps the woman and newborn at the center of care.Setting up such collaborative teams of providers requires quality education of all groups and effective regulation that supports and promotes their collaboration and integration. Providers also need continuing professional development, clear career pathways, and a regulatory environment that allows the provision of appropriate skill mix at all levels of the system.In the midwife-led unit, Esther, as a new mum, would also obtain information on postnatal care along with her newborn’s care: exclusive breastfeeding, basic hygiene, infection control, cord care, etc. Because the midwife has taken care of Esther from beginning to end, she will be familiar with her circumstances at home and can ensure that effective follow-up care is provided in her community.When asked, women made clear what they need for a healthy pregnancy. First, women feel that information and education are essential to allow them to learn for themselves. Also, they need to know and understand the organisation of services and receive care that is respectful and given by staff who engender trust, personalized to meet their individual needs, and offered by care providers who are kind. Making midwife-led units available is an effective way to increase the capacity of the health system, cover the needs of the population, contain costs, and increase user satisfaction. Midwife-led care is more than a simple win-win. Posted on September 8, 2014November 2, 2016By: Petra ten Hoope-Bender, Director of Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn and Child Health, ICS Integrare; Sheetal Sharma, Research and Knowledge Management Associate, ICS IntegrareClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post is part of our “Continuum of Care” blog series hosted by the Maternal Health Task Forcelast_img read more

How to Use Storytelling to Engage Donors

first_imgNonprofit storytelling is the basis of everything we do. It is how we know our personal and cultural histories, how we connect to the world around us, and how we understand each other. Story inspires, informs, and motivates us.A story that captures the imagination and motivates your audience to take action is the foundation of your success as a nonprofit leader.Nonprofits use storytelling on a daily basis.You may not even be aware of how much storytelling influences your work. Everything about your nonprofit is a story—your mission statement, your organizational history, program descriptions, solicitation appeals. You tell a story on every page of your website, in every thank you letter, grant application, or press release.Your story is what attracts people to you—and what keeps them coming back. Stories build interest, awareness, and empathy. They are the basic building blocks for reaching every goal you have. For more tips on telling your organization’s stories, download our Nonprofit Storytelling Mini-Guide.Use your nonprofits’ stories to:Make your case for change.Raise money and engage donors.Secure grants and sponsorship.Inspire advocates, donors, board, staff, and volunteers.Create an emotional connection to your work.Recruit community partners to build coalitions.Intrigue journalists.Reframe the conversation in times of crisis.Spread the word about successes.How to makes a good story greatStories evoke emotion, reveal conflict, inspire action, and offer resolution.The strongest stories are simultaneously entertaining and inspiring. They make you care about those involved and keep you wanting to know what happens next. Great stories expand the way you see the world and create compassion. The key to telling any story begins with a few questions:Who are you telling your story to?Why are you telling it?What do you want them to do?From your nonprofit’s history to community programs to profiles of members and beneficiaries, you have great stories at your fingertips. Put a human face on your facts and statistics, and get to the heart of the matter.Breaking Through Writer’s BlockNot sure how to start? You’re not alone. Everyone gets writer’s block. Don’t let it intimidate you. The best remedy is to simply put something down on paper. You can polish it later.In 2012, director and Pixar storyboard artist Emma Coats shared 22 storytelling tips on Twitter, including the Pixar version of this universal story arc. Stuck on how to tell your story? Use this Mad Libs-style writing prompt to get you started.“Once Upon a Time” Writing PromptOnce upon a time there was ______________________. Every day, ______________________. One day ______________________. Because of that, ______________________. Because of that, ______________________. Until finally______________________.We’d love to hear from you. Share your story with us in the comments!And for more tips on telling your organization’s stories, download our Nonprofit Storytelling Mini-Guide.last_img read more

Accountability for RMNCAH in India: The Critical Role of Civil Society

first_imgPosted on June 21, 2016July 28, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)By Poonam Muttreja, Executive Director, Population Foundation of India, and Nejla Liias, President and Founder, Global Health VisionsWith the 2015 launch of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the Global Strategy for Women’s, Children’s, and Adolescents’ Health, and the Global Financing Facility (GFF), the world is poised to improve the survival, health, and wellbeing of women, children, and adolescents. In particular, making progress in India is crucial because it bears so much of the world’s burden of mortality and morbidity. In 2015, India accounted for an estimated 15% (45,000) of all maternal deaths (303,000) worldwide. Indeed, India’s own reproductive, maternal, newborn, child, and adolescent health (RMNCH+A)[1] strategic approach, launched in 2013, directs states to address the major causes of mortality and issues of access to care across the full continuum of care, with a special focus on reaching the most vulnerable.Global and national goals, plans, and strategies are just the first step, however. The accountability mechanisms put in place to ensure that budgets, programs, and policies are implemented effectively and benefit the target communities are equally important. India can learn valuable lessons from examples of accountability mechanisms led by or involving civil society, several of which were outlined in the recently released report, Engendering Accountability: Upholding Commitments to Maternal and Newborn Health.Learning From Community Action for HealthCommunity Action for Health (CAH), for example, is one program with social accountability practices that could be applied to the RMNCAH field. It is a key strategy of the National Health Mission (NHM), a flagship program of the Government of India, which places people at the center of the process of ensuring that the health needs and rights of the community are being fulfilled. It allows them to actively and regularly monitor the progress of the NHM interventions in their areas. It also results in communities participating and strengthening health services.CAH processes are organized at primary and community health centers, and at the village, block, district, and state levels. In most states, a state-level civil society organization (CSO) manages community-based monitoring and planning processes with district and block level CSOs and the state health department. Now operating in 205 districts across 19 states, CAH has the potential to make a huge impact.The process involves the following steps:Create community awareness on health entitlements and the roles and responsibilities of service providers.Train and mentor Village Health, Nutrition and Sanitation, and Patient Welfare Committees (Rogi Kalyan Samitis) to undertake community monitoring of health services.Form and train planning and monitoring committees at the state, district, and block levels to discuss and take action on issues and gaps that emerge from the community monitoring process.Collect data using tools such as report cards and expenditure reviews.Compile and analyze data using a scoring system categorized into good, average, and poor services.Share results of the community monitoring process with stakeholders at the facility, block, and district levels.Develop solutions to problems that incorporate local input and planning.Organize public dialogues to provide a forum for engagement of the community with health providers to share key findings and discuss proposed solutions.Take corrective action by engaging with officials on plans to address key issues and concerns.Use media as an ally to enhance pressure on stakeholders and keep them accountable.Four Key Lessons in AccountabilityThe RMNCAH community can learn the following from the CAH model:When civil society and government work together, health service delivery improves. CAH is a unique government-led mechanism that seeks to improve service delivery by engaging with civil society and community structures created under the NHM. The process is guided by the Advisory Group on Community Action (AGCA) Committee constituted by the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, and for which the Population Foundation of India hosts the secretariat. Partnership between government and civil society allows for dialogue and understanding between citizens, health care providers, and government officials. There is still work to be done. Political will and the capacity to implement accountability mechanisms among both civil society and government vary tremendously throughout the country. Thus, more resources and support are needed to continue strengthening skills and commitment. This is a common challenge across many accountability efforts in India. The NHM is now developing an institutionalized mechanism for grievance redressal, as a weak or absent mechanism for timely and effective redressal has a negative effect on trust and participation of communities in the processes. Additionally, limited engagement with elected representatives to advocate for corrective action and planning on issues and gaps emerging from the CAH – especially at the state and national level – poses a challenge to scale up.Efforts like CAH can provide a unique value-add to the RMNCAH accountability landscape. It is not the only high-impact accountability initiative in India involving or led by civil society (see the Engendering Accountability India Case Study for others), but it is an exemplary one. And at this critical juncture – as India and the world embark on a new era of focus on women, children, and adolescents under the SDGs, Global Strategy, and the Global Financing Facility – we strongly encourage those involved to keep the critical role that civil society plays in accountability top-of-mind and to draw on lessons learned from successful approaches like CAH. Applying accountability strategies ensures that resources are spent wisely and impact the lives of those they aim to benefit.—For more details on CAH, please visit www.nrhmcommunityaction.org. Watch the documentary film about the work of CAH here.[1] The acronym RMNCH+A was specifically developed by the Government of India as part of its 2013 strategy, and is thus referred to as such here. However, throughout the remainder of this post, the more commonly-used RMNCAH acronym will be utilized.Share this: Bring the “public” into the public health system. CAH engages citizens and civil society to improve health care delivery and connects community voices and data to action. The AGCA also regularly participates in the Common Review Mission, which provides critical inputs and suggestions on the effectiveness of the NHM implementation at the grassroots level. Accountability works. An external evaluation of the CAH pilot phase that was undertaken across 36 districts and 9 states between 2007 and 2009 observed that the process: (a) empowered the community (especially marginalized groups) to engage with the health department; (b) strengthened service delivery and facilitated communities in availing health entitlements with improved range, access, and quality of services during health outreach sessions and in the public health facilities; (c) enabled local-level planning and corrective action; and (d) enhanced accountability among the service providers, seen in the increased availability of staff in health facilities, timely and adequate distribution of drugs, and a decrease in demands for informal payments. Since then, the CAH processes have been simplified and adapted to the state and local contexts to enable easier adoption and scale up. ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more