Linde to supply air gases to Chinese chemicals producer Dahua Group in Dalian

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

LSU’s Breaux, Hall take top honors

first_imgBATON ROUGE – For the seventh time in her career LSU gymnastics head coach D-D Breaux received the Southeastern Conference Coach of the Year award, while senior Lloimincia Hall earned SEC Event Specialist of the Year in a vote of the league’s coaches, the SEC office announced Thursday.Breaux shared the coach of the year honor with Auburn’s Jeff Graba.The SEC Specialist of the Year award is only in its second year of existence, and Hall won the vote in part by ranking as the nation’s No. 1 performer on floor in both regional qualifying score (9.975) and season average (9.941).For the fourth time in her four-year career, Hall won at least a share of the SEC floor exercise title with a 9.975 at the 2015 SEC Championship. She became only the second gymnast in conference history to win four SEC titles in the same event, joining Ashley Miles from Alabama, who won the floor title from 2003-06.A two-time recipient of the SEC Specialist of the Week award this year, Hall added two perfect 10.0 scores on floor this season to bring her career total to seven, the most on floor in LSU history. Hall is the only gymnast in the nation with two 10s on floor this season.She has captured seven individual titles this season, winning six on floor and one on vault. For her career, she holds 31 titles on floor, the most in LSU history.Breaux guided fourth-ranked LSU to a 13-1 overall regular season record, which included a perfect 7-0 conference mark for the first time in school history.In addition, LSU has shattered school records all season, including earning the highest score in program history at 198.375. In fact, LSU has recorded the Nos. 1, 3 and 5 best team scores in program history this season, highlighted by two 198 scores.Breaux coached the Tigers to a second-place finish at the SEC Championship, the best team finish since 2005 when LSU was also second.Florida’s Kytra Hunter was named the SEC Gymnast of the Year, while Florida’s Kennedy Baker and Arkansas’ Paige Zaziski shared SEC Freshman of the Year honors. Missouri’s Katelyn Trevino earned SEC Scholar-Athlete of the Year.LSU also placed four gymnasts on the All-SEC Team. It is only the second time in school history four Tigers earned All-SEC honors in the same season, joining the 2012 squad.Rheagan Courville, Jessie Jordan, Myia Hambrick and Hall netted All-SEC honors with their performance at the 2015 SEC Championship. In addition, Hambrick tallied SEC All-Freshman Team honors.The All-SEC Team is comprised of the student-athletes with the top two scores (including ties) on each event and in the all-around competition in the first and second sessions of the SEC Championship. The All-Freshman Team is comprised of the freshman student-athlete with the top score (including ties) on each event in the first session of the SEC Championship and the student-athlete with the top score (including ties) on each event in the second session of the SEC Championship. The All-Freshman Team will also include the freshmen student-athletes with the top two all-around scores (including ties) in the first session of the SEC Championship and the freshmen student-athletes with the top two all-around scores (including ties) in the second session of the SEC Championship.Courville and Jordan tied for the SEC all-around title to earn their spots on the All-SEC team. Hambrick tied with Courville for the SEC vault title, and Hall won her fourth SEC floor title to make the All-SEC team.Courville and Hall have earned All-SEC honors all four years of their career, and Jordan is a three-year honoree.Hambrick is the fifth Tiger to receive SEC All-Freshman Team honors since the honor was first given in 2011. Hambrick joins Sarie Morrison (2011), Courville (2012), Hall (2012), Jordan (2012) and Jessica Savona (2013).LSU has now featured 32 gymnasts who have produced 66 total All-SEC honors in program history.LSU (19-2) returns to action at the NCAA Ames Regional hosted by Iowa State on April 4. The Tigers are the No. 1 seed and will compete for a spot at the NCAA Championships against No. 9 Nebraska, No. 16 Denver, Washington, Michigan State and Iowa State.2015 SEC Gymnastics AwardsGymnast of the Year: Kytra Hunter, FloridaEvent Specialist of the Year: Lloimincia Hall, LSUCo-Freshmen of the Year: Paige Zaziski, Arkansas and Kennedy Baker, FloridaScholar-Athlete of the Year: Katelyn Trevino, MissouriCo-Coaches of the Year: D-D Breaux, LSU and Jeff Graba, Auburn2015 All-SEC TeamLauren Beers, AlabamaKaitlyn Clark, AlabamaKeely McNeer, AlabamaCarley Sims, AlabamaHeather Elswick, ArkansasAmanda Wellick, ArkansasPaige Zaziski, ArkansasLexus Demers, AuburnAbby Milliet, AuburnMegan Walker, AuburnKennedy Baker, FloridaClaire Boyce, FloridaBridgette Caquatto, FloridaKytra Hunter, FloridaAlex McMurtry, FloridaBridget Sloan, FloridaGigi Marino, GeorgiaMary Beth Box, GeorgiaRachel Schick, GeorgiaBrittany Rogers, GeorgiaTaylor Puryear, KentuckySydney Waltz, KentuckyRheagan Courville, LSULloimincia Hall, LSUMyia Hambrick, LSUJessie Jordan, LSULaura Kappler, MissouriSEC All-Freshman TeamPaige Zaziski, ArkansasAbby Milliet, AuburnKennedy Baker, FloridaAlex McMurtry, FloridaGigi Marino, GeorgiaNatalie Vaculik, GeorgiaCori Rechenmacher, KentuckyMyia Hambrick, LSUBecca Schugel, Missourilast_img read more

Tiwari ends golf season with New Trend Auto tournament victory

first_imgThe Lusignan Golf Club on Saturday capped off an exceptional year with Kalyan Tiwari walking away as champion in the New Trend Auto tournament. Played with a lush green outfield, the tournament was scored via best gross score with Tiwari, who returned after a short hiatus ending on 67/16. William Walker was second with 68/12 while Mohanlall Dinanauth (68/6) rounded off the podium. Patrick Prashad (72/8), Shanella London (72/15) and Rabindranauth Persaud (72/16) tied for fourth.Owner of New Trend Auto, Rudy Ramalingum, whose first golf tournament sponsorship was under the Foodtown banner in June 2018, also sponsored under the New Trend Auto banner in March 2019 and has again stepped in to readily support development of golfing in Guyana and the Lusignan Golf Club, with this year-end tournament.last_img read more

Brightkite for Blackberry Released Open Source

first_imgTags:#start#startups According to the Brightkite blog, yesterday evening 3rd party developer Chris Hallgrenopened the source code for his Brightkite BlackBerry application (Brightberry). Denver-based Brightkite is best known as the mobile social application that integrates with Facebook and Twitter to let users check in, find friends and discover the history of the places they frequent. After launching their iPhone application in October 2008, we named it the Most Promising Company of 2008. And while it’s no small feat to impress the ReadWriteWeb team, the service’s growth potential appears endless with one in three smartphone owners already using location-based services. It’s not surprising that Blackberry users have eagerly anticipated Brightberry since App World first launched. Chris Hallgren’s first efforts at Brightberry allowed users to share locations and place marks, monitor friends, send messages and post comments. However, the app still lacked the capabilities and sex appeal of its iPhone predecessor. Following the Linus’ Law tenet, “given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow”, Hallgren hopes that by making his app open source, he’ll gain a better user interface, improved load times, photo uploading, friend requests, place mark creation and place streams. Other location-based Blackberry apps with similar functionality include Loopt and Buzzd.Brightberry is available in its current iteration at bbhn.mobi or if you’re a developer and you’d like to help Hallgren do some of the heavy lifting, check out the GitHub project profile. dana oshiro 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img Related Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostinglast_img read more

TRI-STATE LEGISLATORS SAY STATES SHARE SIMILAR PROBLEMS

first_imgIOWA, NEBRASKA AND SOUTH DAKOTA FACE SIMILAR ISSUES WHEN IT COMES TO REVENUE, WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT AND HOUSING.LEGISLATORS FROM THE TRI-STATE AREA DISCUSSED THOSE ISSUES AND OTHERS AFFECTING SIOUXLAND AT A FORUM HOSTED BY SIMPCO AND WESTERN IOWA TECH COMMUNITY COLLEGE ON FRIDAY.NEBRASKA STATE SENATOR JONI ALBRECHT, WHO SERVES DAKOTA COUNTY IN THE UNICAMERAL, WAS AMONG THE PARTICIPANTS.SHE LIKED AN IDEA FROM SOUTH DAKOTA REPRESENTATIVE DAVID ANDERSON OF UNION COUNTY WHERE PRISONERS LEARN THE HOUSING TRADE TO PROVIDE THEM A SKILL WHEN THEY ARE RELEASED FROM INCARCERATION:Audio Playerhttp://kscj.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/SIMPCO.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.OC………OUR SYSTEM. :11SIMPCO, THE SIOUXLAND INTERSTATE METROPOLITAN PLANNING COUNCIL, PROMOTES PROJECT PLANNING AND PARTNERSHIPS AMONG THE TRI-STATE ENTITIES.STATE REPRESENTATIVE CHRIS HALL OF SIOUX CITY SAYS THAT HELPS THE STATES SOLVE THOSE COMMON ISSUES:Audio Playerhttp://kscj.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/SIMPCO2.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.OC……..ISSUE RIGHT NOW. :21DAVID ANDERSON TALKED ABOUT SOUTH DAKOTA’S LAWSUIT TO COLLECT SALES TAX ON ALL INTERNET SALES TRANSACTIONS.ALL THE REPRESENTATIVES SAID THEY ARE WAITING FOR A RULING BEFORE THEIR STATE LEGISLATURES CAN TAKE ACTION TO TRY TO COLLECT THOSE TAXES.ALBRECHT SAYS RECEIVING INPUT AT A FORUM WITH URBAN AND RURAL ATTENDEES FROM THE TRI-STATE REGION BENEFITS EVERYONE:Audio Playerhttp://kscj.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/SIMPCO1.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.OC…..THE SAME THINGS. :12STATE REPRESENTATIVE TIM KACENA OF SIOUX CITY ALSO ATTENDED THE CONFERENCE, ALONG WITH SEVERAL AREA CITY AND COUNTY OFFICIALS AND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE MEMBERS.last_img read more

5 Principles for a More Effective Nonprofit Website

first_imgMake it easy for people to share and connect. Finally, make it easy for people to connect with you and share your site with their friends by including buttons and links to Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. When it comes to your donate button, think big, bold and above the fold. Make it easier for people to give online by helping supporters find your button in the first place. Put it on every page of your website. Stay away from vague words like “support” or “help.” If you want people to donate, say “donate now.” Determine what you want visitors do and offer a clear call to action. Think about the most important things you want a visitor to do and make the pages of your website clearly guide visitors toward those actions. Note: You may want to alter your calls to actions at different times of the year. Use more photos and video to showcase your work. The quickest way to make an emotional connection with your website visitors is to, in a sense, make eye contact with them. This is why a photo of one person or animal you are helping works much better than an image of an inanimate object. Don’t let your perceived level of quality hold you back – whether you caught a clip of a child saying thank you at your last event with your iPhone or took candid photos of volunteers helping in a soup kitchen – the authenticity will shine through.center_img Your nonprofit website is a critical resource for engaging with three important audiences:All of your constituents, including volunteers, alumni, members and advocacy supportersAll of your donors – both current and prospectivePeople who have little to no previous knowledge about your nonprofit.Whether you plan a total redesign or just a few tweaks, a few simple changes to your website can make a big difference in how people perceive and interact with your cause. Ditch the text. Familiar with the phrase “less is more”? People do not read websites—they scan them. Think in terms of headings, bullets, lists and images. When it comes to adding text to your site, be ruthless. Eliminate unnecessary words or phrases and make the ones you do include count by making them clear and compelling.last_img read more

3 reasons donors won’t give — and what to do about it

first_imgDonors feel they have no connection to your charity.For your appeals to be effective, you must answer the question of “Why me?” Your need alone is not enough. You are competing with many messages and many appeals. Think about why your cause is personally meaningful to your audience. Here’s how to do it:Understand why your donors give. Invite them to tell you their stories to gain insight on what motivates people to support your programs. In-person events, thank you phone calls, and online surveys are all easy ways to collect this information.Segment and target appropriately. Don’t use the “spray and pray” method of marketing to win support for your cause. Segment your audience and tailor your messages to speak to each group. (Learn how you can appeal to your audience’s sense of identity.) In a recent review of U.S. Trust’s Insights on Wealth and Worth report on wealthy donors, The New York Times shared three key reasons why donors don’t give. While the report focused on those who have at least $3 million in investable assets, it’s not hard to imagine that these reasons are similar for donors of all income levels. Here are three reasons donors may opt not to give to your organization this December, and some ways you can address their concerns:Donors are concerned their gift will not be used wisely.If a donor is unsure about how their gift will be used or if there is any question that their gift will be put to good use, they’re not going to respond to your fundraising appeal. It’s critical that you let donors know the impact their gift will have. Here’s how to do it:Be clear about how their gift will be used. Give would-be donors tangible examples of how their donations will be used to address the problem you’re trying to solve. Let them know how their dollars will make an impact and be clear about the expected result. (More ideas on how to show the impact of a donation.)Show your results. Highlight what results have already been made possible by other donors and continue to report on your organization’s work. If it’s not easy to find stories and photos that illustrate your progress, donors may assume you have none to share.Share your ratings. Include your ratings and endorsements in your fundraising appeals, on your website, and in printed materials. These ratings reassure donors and let them know that you’re a reputable organization.Make your information readily available. Make your ratings, annual reports, program information and other financial reports easily accessible from your website. Don’t make potential donors have to hunt for the information that will help them make a decision about your cause. Be sure to also update your information on 3rd-party sites, like Charity Navigator and Guidestar, where many donors will go to research your charity. Donors don’t want to be on a “solicitation list.”I’ve heard many donors of all giving levels echo this sentiment, which means we’re not doing our jobs as fundraisers and marketers. It’s our responsibility to balance our fundraising asks with updates and other messages that give back to the donor. This ultimately goes back to the first two points: by being good stewards of donors who feel a connection to your cause, you’ll be creating a community of supporters who will welcome your updates, and even your next fundraising appeal. Here’s how to do it:Have a solid stewardship plan that focuses on building long-term relationships with your supporters. Go beyond a standard thank you letter to keep your donors up to date on the impact of their gift and make donors feel like part of your community. Pamela Grow has some great advice on how to create “wow” experiences for your donors that will make them look forward to hearing from you.Set clear expectations. Let donors know what to expect once they donate. Will they hear from you monthly? Should they expect to receive a newsletter in the mail? Be upfront about your communication frequency—and then make good on your promise.Put the control in the hands of the donor. Obviously, no one ever wants to have a donor opt out of their communications, but you must make it easy for them to do so if they come to that decision. By highlighting the fact that they can easily control their contact preferences, you’ll actually make donors feel more at ease about giving you their contact information.center_img For more tips on connecting with donors this holiday season, don’t miss out on our next free webinar. I’ll be leading a session on how to create an effective appeal for the last few weeks of the year. I’ll share some great examples and take your questions. Here are the details:Free Webinar: Create Amazing Last-Minute Fundraising AppealsTuesday, December 10, 2013 at 1pm ESTRegister Now(Can’t attend the live session? Register anyway and we’ll send the recording of the presentation straight to your inbox!)last_img read more

Because You’re Awesome

first_imgTo our customers, our partners, our readers:  thank you for doing the good that you do.Every day we’re in awe of you.We’re so grateful for the amazing things that are accomplished by the nonprofits we work with: feeding the hungry, healing the sick, sheltering the homeless, saving animals, preserving the environment, fighting for justice, nurturing the arts, and so much more. Each day you are making the world a much brighter and more hopeful place with your passion and creativity. We know it’s not always easy, and we appreciate your dedication. We know that your work matters in a very real way to your communities and the lives that you impact. And this is why we come to work each day: to make it easier for you to focus on helping those that you serve.From all of us here at Network for Good, thank you. We are grateful for you and we wish you a very Happy Thanksgiving.last_img read more

Part 2: The Continuum of Care: Call the Midwife

first_imgIn our first blog, Esther is faced with two issues: a) accessing information (long queues at the clinic) and b) accessing commodities (pregnancy test). Now, she is 31 weeks pregnant and though she’s been to the clinic twice, she still doesn’t know exactly what to do when the big day comes. And what if something strange happens before then? Should she call the midwife? Someone else? And how will she get to the clinic? What if there’s an emergency?She could really use some of the innovative services that are available in other countries, such asWomen’s groups in Bangladesh, India, Nepal and Malawi that discuss and find solutions to help improve maternal and child healthFather’s groups in Spain helping ensure that immigrants have access to servicesMaternity voucher schemes in IndiaMobile phones in Ghana that remind women of their appointments or their medication scheduleHealth promotion groups to encourage antenatal care uptake or address societal issues where the mother-in-law is the main decision-makerLow-cost, locally supported means of transportation such as ambulances, boats, cars, bikes or donkey carts in ZambiaEducation on nutrition and breastfeedingFree services such as China’s free postnatal care home serviceBut Esther also needs the health system to support her by providing quality services along the continuum of care throughout her pregnancy – from home to the clinic. To do this well, health care providers need to know Esther and understand her circumstances. They need to be able to provide the continuum of care as a team, integrating antenatal care with labour services and postnatal care, and providing that care as close as possible to Esther.The Manoshi project, for example, brought that level of care into the slum areas of Bangladesh. The project reduced the famous ”three delays” by providing solid health information on when referral might be necessary, keeping transportation means on stand-by, and dedicating staff to speed women through administrative requirements to facilitate access to emergency maternal and newborn care (EmONC) at the hospital.Midwife-led CareAn existing model of care that is gaining traction in countries like Esther’s is the midwife-led unit. Midwives are able to provide effective comprehensive care from pre-pregnancy through pregnancy, birth and the postnatal period. Setting up a midwife-led unit with a waiting home and close to a hospital means that women can easily access midwifery services throughout pregnancy and childbirth and, if needed, can be seamlessly transferred to next level care or EmONC services. To provide true continuum of care the midwife must be able to call on an obstetrician and the hospital at any time and be part of an integrated team of health care providers, associates and lay health workers that reach from the community to the hospital and keeps the woman and newborn at the center of care.Setting up such collaborative teams of providers requires quality education of all groups and effective regulation that supports and promotes their collaboration and integration. Providers also need continuing professional development, clear career pathways, and a regulatory environment that allows the provision of appropriate skill mix at all levels of the system.In the midwife-led unit, Esther, as a new mum, would also obtain information on postnatal care along with her newborn’s care: exclusive breastfeeding, basic hygiene, infection control, cord care, etc. Because the midwife has taken care of Esther from beginning to end, she will be familiar with her circumstances at home and can ensure that effective follow-up care is provided in her community.When asked, women made clear what they need for a healthy pregnancy. First, women feel that information and education are essential to allow them to learn for themselves. Also, they need to know and understand the organisation of services and receive care that is respectful and given by staff who engender trust, personalized to meet their individual needs, and offered by care providers who are kind. Making midwife-led units available is an effective way to increase the capacity of the health system, cover the needs of the population, contain costs, and increase user satisfaction. Midwife-led care is more than a simple win-win.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:,In our first blog, Esther is faced with two issues: a) accessing information (long queues at the clinic) and b) accessing commodities (pregnancy test). Now, she is 31 weeks pregnant and though she’s been to the clinic twice, she still doesn’t know exactly what to do when the big day comes. And what if something strange happens before then? Should she call the midwife? Someone else? And how will she get to the clinic? What if there’s an emergency?She could really use some of the innovative services that are available in other countries, such asWomen’s groups in Bangladesh, India, Nepal and Malawi that discuss and find solutions to help improve maternal and child healthFather’s groups in Spain helping ensure that immigrants have access to servicesMaternity voucher schemes in IndiaMobile phones in Ghana that remind women of their appointments or their medication scheduleHealth promotion groups to encourage antenatal care uptake or address societal issues where the mother-in-law is the main decision-makerLow-cost, locally supported means of transportation such as ambulances, boats, cars, bikes or donkey carts in ZambiaEducation on nutrition and breastfeedingFree services such as China’s free postnatal care home serviceBut Esther also needs the health system to support her by providing quality services along the continuum of care throughout her pregnancy – from home to the clinic. To do this well, health care providers need to know Esther and understand her circumstances. They need to be able to provide the continuum of care as a team, integrating antenatal care with labour services and postnatal care, and providing that care as close as possible to Esther.The Manoshi project, for example, brought that level of care into the slum areas of Bangladesh. The project reduced the famous ”three delays” by providing solid health information on when referral might be necessary, keeping transportation means on stand-by, and dedicating staff to speed women through administrative requirements to facilitate access to emergency maternal and newborn care (EmONC) at the hospital.Midwife-led CareAn existing model of care that is gaining traction in countries like Esther’s is the midwife-led unit. Midwives are able to provide effective comprehensive care from pre-pregnancy through pregnancy, birth and the postnatal period. Setting up a midwife-led unit with a waiting home and close to a hospital means that women can easily access midwifery services throughout pregnancy and childbirth and, if needed, can be seamlessly transferred to next level care or EmONC services. To provide true continuum of care the midwife must be able to call on an obstetrician and the hospital at any time and be part of an integrated team of health care providers, associates and lay health workers that reach from the community to the hospital and keeps the woman and newborn at the center of care.Setting up such collaborative teams of providers requires quality education of all groups and effective regulation that supports and promotes their collaboration and integration. Providers also need continuing professional development, clear career pathways, and a regulatory environment that allows the provision of appropriate skill mix at all levels of the system.In the midwife-led unit, Esther, as a new mum, would also obtain information on postnatal care along with her newborn’s care: exclusive breastfeeding, basic hygiene, infection control, cord care, etc. Because the midwife has taken care of Esther from beginning to end, she will be familiar with her circumstances at home and can ensure that effective follow-up care is provided in her community.When asked, women made clear what they need for a healthy pregnancy. First, women feel that information and education are essential to allow them to learn for themselves. Also, they need to know and understand the organisation of services and receive care that is respectful and given by staff who engender trust, personalized to meet their individual needs, and offered by care providers who are kind. Making midwife-led units available is an effective way to increase the capacity of the health system, cover the needs of the population, contain costs, and increase user satisfaction. Midwife-led care is more than a simple win-win. Posted on September 8, 2014November 2, 2016By: Petra ten Hoope-Bender, Director of Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn and Child Health, ICS Integrare; Sheetal Sharma, Research and Knowledge Management Associate, ICS IntegrareClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post is part of our “Continuum of Care” blog series hosted by the Maternal Health Task Forcelast_img read more

How Donor Data Management Empowers Nonprofits

first_img“Segmenting our donors was the engine behind making our year-end campaigns more successful.After a year of using Network for Good, we beat our holiday giving goal by $12K!”– Melanie Burch, Middleburg Humane Foundation Director of DevelopmentMiddleburg Humane Foundation is a Virginia-based nonprofit founded in 1994 that provides a safe haven for abused, neglected, and at-risk animals on a 4.5-acre farm shelter. Specializing in rescuing and rehabilitating animals that come to the shelter from abusive situations, MHF offers much-needed medical care before placing animals with permanent or foster families. In addition to the shelter, MHF runs a grooming parlor, thrift shop, and multiple outreach programs ranging from assistance to education to intervention.For funding, MHF relies on private donors and sponsors to supplement their earned income. The need for better donor management became imperative when deciding to undertake a capital campaign for a new, state-of-the-art equine rehabilitation and animal rescue facility. MHF’s Director of Development, Melanie Burch, used Network for Good’s Donor Management System (DMS) to help her organize their myriad spreadsheets and handwritten notes.As a result, MHF saw a boost in donations and successful campaigns, as well as an improvement in the quality and frequency of their engagement with donors and volunteers. Not only were they able to see an individual’s overall activity with the organization, they were able to segment their data and target their communications to specific donors.Once Melanie and her staff imported their data into the Network for Good DMS, they were able to see exactly who was donating to MHF, what programs they were attracted to, or how else they were involved with the organization. With this organized, central hub of information at their fingertips, they can now approach a broader range of potential donors. In addition to seeing a fundraising boost, Network for Good’s software has helped Melanie and her staff quickly and easily pull reports, and create professional-looking campaign emails.As Melanie put it, “The ability to pull up someone’s name with all their donor data in front of me and see what they are opening and clicking on is a tremendous help.”Read our case study to learn about how switching to DMS led to MHF’s successful capital campaign—and how it can work for you or download our on-demand webinar “Obtain & Utilize Donor Data Effectively to Increase Giving” where we explored the topic of donor data in greater detail.last_img read more