Audio: The true story of how 96 critically endangered sea turtle hatchlings survived New York City

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored This past summer, beachgoers in New York City spotted a nesting Kemp’s Ridley sea turtle on West Beach, which is on National Park Service land. Luckily, two of those beachgoers had the presence of mind to call the Riverhead Foundation for Marine Research and Preservation’s 24-hour hotline to report the nesting turtle — which very likely saved the lives of 96 Kemp’s Ridley sea turtle hatchlings.Though the critically endangered species is known to forage in the waters off New York, this was the farthest north a Kemp’s Ridley has ever been known to nest — usually they nest in northern Mexico, with some additional nesting sites in Texas.In consultation with the US Fish & Wildlife Service, National Park Service staff put an exclosure around the nest to protect it from humans and predators, then started making plans to monitor the nest and protect the hatchlings once they arrived and began their trek out to the ocean. But it soon became apparent that unusually high tides were swamping the nest, which could have meant disaster for the developing sea turtle embryos — so the difficult decision was made to excavate the nest and incubate the eggs in a secure facility, which ended up being a National Park Service office closet.We speak with the conservationists and government scientists who discovered and cared for the nest and its occupants in this episode of the Mongabay Newscast, including Patti Rafferty of the National Park Service, Steve Sinkevich of the US Fish & Wildlife Service, and Maxine Montello of the Riverhead Foundation for Marine Research and Preservation. (If you happen to be in New York and spot a sea turtle or any other marine animal in need of help, you can call the Riverhead Foundation’s 24-hour stranding hotline at +1 (631) 369-9829.)Together, these guests help tell this incredible conservation success story, and answer questions such as whether or not it’s a bad sign that a Kemp’s Ridley came all the way to NYC to nest in the first place.Here’s this episode’s top news:New research quantifies ecosystem services provided by Amazon rainforestMega-dam costs outweigh benefits, global building spree should end: expertsFirst wild Sumatran rhino in Borneo captured for breeding campaignWould you like to hear about the Mongabay team’s long list of snake bites, or learn which huge mammal chased our Program Manager up a tree? Have you ever wondered about the origins of Mongabay, and how we got that name? We now offer Insider Content that gives members exclusive access to behind-the-scenes reporting and stories from our team. For a small monthly donation, you’ll get answers to questions like these and support our work in a new way. Visit mongabay.com/insider to learn more and join the growing community of Mongabay readers on the inside track.If you enjoy the Mongabay Newscast, we ask that you please consider becoming a monthly sponsor via our Patreon page, at patreon.com/mongabay. Just a dollar per month will really help us offset the production costs and hosting fees, so if you’re a fan of our audio reports from nature’s frontline, please support the Mongabay Newscast at patreon.com/mongabay.You can subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast on Android, the Google Podcasts app, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn, RSS, Castbox, Pocket Casts, and via Spotify. Or listen to all our episodes via the Mongabay website here on the podcast homepage.A Kemp’s Ridley sea turtle hatchling on West Beach in New York City, making its way to the Atlantic Ocean. Photo Credit: US National Park Service.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Mike Gaworecki On this episode, the true story of how 96 critically endangered sea turtles survived a New York City beach — with a little help from some dedicated conservationists.This past summer, beachgoers in New York City spotted a nesting Kemp’s Ridley sea turtle on West Beach, which is on National Park Service land.Luckily, two of those beachgoers had the presence of mind to call the Riverhead Foundation for Marine Research and Preservation’s 24-hour hotline to report the nesting turtle — which very likely saved the lives of 96 Kemp’s Ridley sea turtle hatchlings. On this episode, the true story of how 96 critically endangered sea turtles survived a New York City beach — with a little help from some dedicated conservationists and scientists.Listen here: Amazon Rainforest, Amphibians, Animals, Climate Change and Dams, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Dams, Ecosystem Services, Endangered Species, Endangered Species Act, Environment, Forests, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Herps, Hydroelectric Power, Interviews, Mammals, Marine Animals, Oceans, Podcast, Rhinos, Saving Species From Extinction, Sea Turtles, Sumatran Rhino, Tropical Forests, Turtles, Wildlife Conservation last_img read more

One Injured in Cullowhee Shooting

first_imgOn October 24, 2017 at approximately 9:13 P/M the Jackson County Sheriff’s Office responded to 31 Antler Dr. River Walk Apartments located in Cullowhee to a reported shooting that had occurred.When officers arrived on scene they discovered the victim Corey Ladarrius Alston a 19 year old male had been shot in the leg and was transported by West Care EMS to Memorial Mission Hospital with non-life threatening injuries.No arrests have been made at this time and the investigation is ongoing.  This is an isolated incident and we have no reason to feel a threat to the community.Anyone located within the area that may have information should contact the Jackson County Sheriff’s Office at 828-631-1125.last_img read more

Love Letter to Nonprofits

first_imgI love nonprofits. I must. Why else would I voluntarily spend most of my career working 12-14 hour days for less money than the for-profit sector pays? And vacations or retirement? Those are for other people. Because working for a nonprofit isn’t a traditional job. It’s a vocation. A calling. A personal mission.Nonprofits uplift communities, aid and protect us in hard times, create social change, and inspire action. Whether stemming from religious beliefs, cultural traditions, justice, or simple human decency, nonprofits are what make our world a better place.“The Third Sector”Since America’s earliest days, charitable organizations have been the bridge between what the government can provide and what people need. From churches and schools to libraries and community centers, nonprofits have always brought people together. Working alongside the public and private sectors, philanthropic organizations—”the third sector”—create the backbone of America.As early as 1894, the U.S. government was making tax exemptions for certain organizations. Then came prohibition on private inurement, which ensured that no individual associated with tax-exempt organizations financially benefitted from its existence. To help fund America’s participation in WWI and encourage individual philanthropy, The Revenue Act of 1917 allowed individuals to deduct charitable giving. Corporations eventually followed suit in 1935. In the early 20th century, prominent Americans such as Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, and John Ford sought ways to use their wealth for good and created foundations that still stand today.How Nonprofits Shaped AmericaFrom the Native American tradition of giving as a sign of honor to early settlers seeking refuge from persecution to Cotton Mather’s Essays to Do Good and abolitionists who took great risks to help others, we have a long tradition of philanthropy in this country. It has evolved over the decades, but it is uniquely American.1940sDuring World War II, Americans rationed supplies to support the war effort and soldiers. The YMCA, Salvation Army, National Jewish Welfare Board, and several other organizations united under Franklin D. Roosevelt to create the USO. Following the war, Americans sent supplies to Europeans in need and the U.S. government launched the Marshall Plan to help rebuild Europe.1960s and 1970sActivism of the 1960s and 1970s reverberates today in the Me Too and Black Lives Matter movements. From the March on Washington to Title IX, the Civil Rights Movement and Women’s Rights Movement were a tectonic shift in society that inspired individuals and foundations to contribute time, money, and passion—and set the bar for modern activism and philanthropy.TodayWith the advent of the internet as well as online and mobile giving, we have seen an unprecedented increase in American involvement in global philanthropic relief following natural disasters such as the Indian Ocean tsunami, Japanese tsunami, and Haitian earthquake. Support and connectivity were cemented closer to home following the devastation of September 11, Hurricane Katrina, and Hurricane Maria. In 2012, that connectivity earned a Global Day of Giving with the launch of #GivingTuesday.PhilanthropiaSounds almost like utopia, doesn’t it? A place of ideal perfection. The word philanthropy, from the Greek philanthropia, means “love of mankind.” I can’t think of anything more ideal or perfect. That ideal is what donors support. That pursuit of perfection is what nonprofits provide. And that’s why I love them.Read more on The Nonprofit Bloglast_img read more

Why you are so motivated in your work

first_imgWhen we think about what motivates people at work, some cliches come out. Money? Maybe. Power? Perhaps. But as someone working for a mission you know it’s something else — altruism.But what may surprise you is this isn’t just a truism in the nonprofit sector. It works in most places.This past Sunday, the New York Times had a fascinating magazine profile of Adam Grant, the youngest-tenured and highest rated professor at Wharton. Grant focuses on workplace psychology and the effects of altruism in your career. His research shows generosity at work is a strong motivator that spurs increased productivity and creativity. Helping others, it seems, helps ourselves. (As a person, Grant is radically generous, spending hours a day helping students, colleagues and strangers for the sake of being useful to others.)Early in his career, Grant worked with a demoralized call center to show the positive effects of altruism. Since one of the center’s purposes was funding scholarships, Grant had a student who benefited from the fundraising efforts speak to the telemarketers for ten minutes. The student told the callers how the scholarship had changed his life – and how he was headed off to work for Teach for America. A month later, the call center reported workers were on the phone 142 percent more and raising 171 more. A follow up found revenues had rocketed up 400 percent. Grant concludes the greatest untapped source of motivation is service to others. This reminds me of Daniel Pink’s writing on a higher purpose being a powerful professional motivator.Maybe that’s why there is research suggesting that the first instinct of humans is to contribute to the greater good at their own expense. We’re wired to do what motivates us to do our best.In my own work at Network for Good, where we not only support nonprofits like yours but also seek to help companies bring philanthropy into the workplace, we find these ideas hold true. Allowing employees to do good for others builds loyalty, increases job satisfaction and boosts morale. Giving rewards to employees like charity vouchers have been documented to make people happier and more satisfied with their jobs. We know giving makes us happy. Maybe it makes all of us more motivated – and successful – too.last_img read more

How truly great fundraising can flourish

first_imgOver the past year, researchers Adrian Sargeant and Jen Shang have sought to answer the question, how can truly great fundraising flourish?It’s a timely question given that half of fundraisers want to quit – and a quarter of bosses said they fired their last fundraiser.The report – commissioned by the firm Clayton Burnett Limited – is out, and I wanted to share the findings. (You can get the report and executive summary for free at the firm’s website – just give a it a day or two for them to email it to you.)One answer was that organizations with incredible growth in fundraising have achieved that with the right people. Successful organizations have strong fundraising managers who achieve desired change through a combination of will and personal humility. They “devote considerable attention to what they regard as the critical building blocks of success, namely building an exceptional team, structure(s) and culture.”I’m going to highlight here some of the ways high-performing organizations built their teams. For additional findings, check out the full report.1. The manager built or retooled the fundraising team members and focused on a few, small early wins. This led to “improvement in confidence and morale, which became self-sustaining as individuals began to recognize their own potential to succeed. Technical expertise on the part of team members was important, but so too was conscientiousness, a willingness to support others, and a propensity to engage in appropriate levels of risk-taking.”2. The researchers note this shift in culture addressed turnover woes. “After the right team had been built, none of the organizations we examined suffered from the high turnover rates that otherwise pervade our sector. Being a part of a successful team appears to engender high levels of loyalty and our all our leaders were personally invested in their teams. The loyalty thus cut both ways. It was also interesting to note that those who defined their team more broadly, to include external agency personnel also exhibited a high degree of loyalty to that agency. Some were maintaining relationships with suppliers that had existed for over a decade.”3. Once a strong team was in place, they focused on the big picture in the right ways. Says the report: “We also found evidence in goal setting, that our outstanding leaders aligned their organizational metrics with the longer term drivers of donor value. Their objectives were couched not in the short-term minutia that typically pervade our sector, but in the standards and behaviours they identified would add value forsupporters and thus pay-back in the longer term. Their appraisal and reward systems were similarly aligned, to focus team member ambitions on the things that mattered most to longer term growth.”That said, the researchers also emphasized the system in which these people work: “Great systems are often more important than great people. A well-designed system filled with ordinary but well-trained people can, according to academic research, consistently achieve well above average performance.”I wish we saw more of these approaches. What works at your organization? Which of these ideas resonate with you? Who are your people and what are your systems?last_img read more

How to get your message out

first_imgWe write a lot about how to inspire supporters with compelling stories and clear calls to action, but even the most well-crafted messages are worthless if no one sees them. In addition to your outreach via email marketing or direct mail, it’s equally important to ensure your cause is well-represented through press outreach, social media, and search. Tomorrow, Network for Good is hosting afree webinar for nonprofits to learn more about effective publicity tactics from our friends at PR NewsChannel. This is a great opportunity to get your questions answered and pick up some practical PR tips from the pros, just in time to put them into place for your fall events and year-end fundraising campaigns.Register now for the live webinar on Tuesday, July 30 at 1pm ET. (If you can’t attend the event at that time, go ahead and register — you’ll receive an email with the playback recording of the session, plus the slides.)last_img read more

The 4 qualities of powerful visual storytelling

first_imgContent syndication outlet NewsCred has teamed up with Getty Images to create a new site, The Power of Visual Storytelling. The online guide (and accompanying whitepaper) boils down the essentials of effective imagery into four principles:Be authentic. With stock images and Photoshop, it’s easy to be fake. Allow your readers to connect with the human side of your work by highlighting candid photos that show the reality of your work. Your images don’t have to be perfect, but they do have to stir emotion.Excite the senses. Don’t avoid the gritty details that bring a story to life. Generic or too-glossy photos remove the personality from your subject. Choose or create images that make your audience feel like they can almost hear, smell, and touch the world you’re inviting them into.Evoke a familiar archetype. Tap into what resonates with your audience by creating a persona to connect with their experiences or aspirations. Remember: powerful characters are a must for any great story.Be relevant. To really connect with your supporters, your images and stories need to reflect the things that are immediate and real to them. This means that your outreach must be current and culturally sensitive to make an impact. The Power of Visual Storytelling offers more insight on each of these components, complete with stats and examples. As you’re creating your next campaign, try incorporating all four elements to command attention and draw your audience even closer to your cause. Want more storytelling ideas? Download our free guide: Storytelling for Nonprofits.last_img read more

How Did You Handle…? 2 MORE Examples of Change Ups for 2014 Year-End Campaigns

first_imgRead Part One This post continues our new How Did You Handle…? series—specific how-tos based on your experiences. There’s still time to make productive changes to your year-end appeal! Here are more year-end campaign change-ups, attempted for the first time this year by some of your fundraiser peers (with early results where available).1. Change-Up: Launching matching gifts for first-time donors (including those coming in on #GivingTuesday).We secured two donors—one who is an absolutely new donor—to offer a dollar-for-dollar match (up to $1,000) for all first-time donors. We are also offering a separate $500 match to new online donors on #GivingTuesday.As director of development, I pushed the match approach and found supportive donors. I was thrilled when our executive director jumped on board and found a matching donor for #GivingTuesday.But that’s not all. Our executive director pledged a $500 gift if all staff members contribute to the campaign. Great news: Our board is already at 100%!Goal: I had used the matching challenge in other types of campaigns and found it highly successful in increasing the number of new donors and total gifts. We’re hoping to achieve the same value this year. We’ll keep you posted! Results to Date: Just starting our year-end campaign (our executive director hand-signs all appeal letters and adds personal notes to many of them).Source: Alan Gibby, director of development, Shelter Care Ministries2. Change-Up: Revising our channel and format mix for year-end appeals to include direct mail for prospects who don’t read our emails.After digging into our email database statistics, we noticed that many of our donors don’t check their emails. Direct mail is our best hope for engaging these folks; this way we know they’ll receive an appeal. We’re sending them our first-ever direct mail appeal.Goals: We hope to strongly encourage our consistent donors to increase their gifts and reactivate our lapsed donors.Source: Kiki Fornito, development associate, Build ChangeNote from Nancy: Other fundraisers reported very different changes in their year-end channel and format mix:· “We are moving to an 80-20 split between email and direct mail outreach to members in our fundraising campaigns; the goal is to convert members to donors. Early results are positive,” reports Laural Bowman, political affairs manager with the Ohio State Medical Association.· “We are reaching out via phone to donors as a supplement to our direct mail year-end campaign. Of course, we’re tracking what impact these calls, which are low cost but labor intensive, have on results, and we’ll use that data to fine-tune next year’s year-end approach,” says Jayme Hayes, president of Junior Achievement of the Eastern Shore.Whatever your organization’s mix, the crucial takeaways are to always look hard at response patterns to year-end and other fundraising campaigns and to do more of what’s working and less of what isn’t.If one of these approaches makes sense for your organization—based on data and anecdotes, not just gut instinct—see if there’s at least some small way you can incorporate it into remaining elements of your year-end campaign. It just might make a difference!With refreshing practicality, Nancy Schwartz rolls up her sleeves to help nonprofits develop and implement strategies to build strong relationships that inspire key supporters to action. She shares her deep nonprofit marketing insights—and passion—through consulting, speaking, and her popular blog and e-news at GettingAttention.org.last_img read more

Quick Takeaways from the Pew Social Media Report

first_imgYou can download the full report from the Pew website.So what does this mean for your nonprofit marketing plans?Know your audience.Take the time to define the audience you’re trying to reach and understand where they’re spending their time. If your goal is to activate Boomers, assess your Facebook outreach and create content that appeals to their sense of identity and need for transparency. If you’re looking to mobilize younger supporters, consider documenting your work and the impact of donors via Instagram photos.Resist the urge to be everywhere.The Pew researchers found that 52% of online adults use multiple social media sites, which is an increase from 2013. For most nonprofits, though, it’s probably not advisable or realistic to spread resources too thin across multiple outlets. Your best bet, especially if you’re still establishing your social media strategy, is to focus on regular quality engagement on one platform. Measure your results and keep an eye on relevant activity on other networks before expanding. Remember: your social efforts need to reinforce your marketing efforts in other channels.Be realistic about your goals for social. We know that donors are engaging with nonprofits and each other on social, but most online dollars are coming in through non-social. Focus on using social as a listening and engagement platform, rather than expecting Twitter or Facebook to become your organization’s magic money machine. Think of social as a tool for understanding what interests your supporters and use your outreach to develop relationships with them.Carefully measure your ROI.Although Facebook is the most widely used social media site with the most engaged users, keep in mind that it is becoming increasingly more difficult to break through the noise (and the Facebook algorithm) and fully reach your audience through the platform. On the Care2 blog, Allyson Kapin recently outlined why it’s getting harder to see a return from Facebook advertising.Even if you’re not paying for social media advertising, weigh the time and attention your staff spends on social media with the results you see and progress to your goals. To get the most out social, you do need to commit to posting quality content and spending time building your presence and the relationships that result.Is social media on your 2015 list of priorities? Share your thoughts below and let us know how you’re incorporating Facebook, Twitter, and others into your nonprofit marketing strategy. The folks at the Pew Research Center recently published updates to their Social Media Report. Here are a few highlights:Facebook still reigns supreme. It comes as no surprise that 71% of all online adults are on Facebook, which also sees 70% of users engaging with the site at least daily.More older adults adopting social networks. But they’re mostly on Facebook. 56% of all online adults 65 and older now use Facebook, which equals 31% of all seniors. That said, all networks featured in the report saw significant jumps in the number of 65+ users.Visual platforms continue to emerge as key networks, especially with younger users. Over half of young adults (ages 18-29) online use Instagram. Nearly half of all Instagram users use the site daily.last_img read more

6 Quick Behavioral Economics Lessons for Fundraisers

first_imgLast month I had the chance to listen to Professor Judd Kessler of the Wharton School during the Ruffalo Noel Levitz Annual Fundraising Conference in Minneapolis. He shared insight on how behavioral economics can affect nonprofit fundraising. Wait, what the heck is “behavioral economics”? Think about it as simply understanding the factors and situations that influence behavior and motivate people to take action. Wait, what the heck is “behavioral economics”? Think about it as simply understanding the factors and situations that influence behavior and motivate people to take action. Many researchers have tested which scenarios prompt more charitable donations, many of which are illustrated in The Science of Giving.But behavioral economics isn’t only the territory of PhDs. Professor Kessler encourages all nonprofit marketers to consider themselves to be scientists and to use simple A/B tests as experiments in their fundraising laboratory to sort out what will drive their donors to give more.So, what are the principles that can affect fundraising for both small and large nonprofits? Here’s a quick overview of six common concepts and how you can use them in your fundraising strategy.1. Accountability & RecognitionWhat it is: This is the idea that if someone cares what other people think of them, they may give to appear more generous, responsible, or important.The research: Gerber, Green & Larimer (2008) showed that voter turnout in Michigan was affected when registered voters received a message that indicated other voters would be notified of their neighbors’ voting habits. In a different study, donors were found to give more when they were recognized as consistent donors to a fund.How to do it: Accountability and recognition are two sides of the same coin, with recognition being usually perceived as the more positive of the two. Offering public recognition for donors can inspire donors to give to achieve and maintain the recognition, and this same attention can influence others to give to gain the same status. Give donors a special status when you feature giving opportunities on your website, in your newsletter, and in upcoming appeals.2. Peer PressureWhat it is: In this case, the peer pressure comes from the simple power of the personal ask. If someone personally asks you to do something (especially in person or on the phone), you’re more likely to go along with the request to avoid embarrassment and disappointment, or to win praise.The research: Meer and Rosen (2009) showed that those who were called in addition to receiving a mailed solicitation were more likely to give.How to do it: In addition to your direct mail and email appeals, make sure you are calling or meeting with key supporters to make that personal connection and encourage them to complete their gift. Bonus: you’ll likely learn more information that will help you nurture the relationship or fix issues that may have prevented future giving.3. Social Information/Social ProofWhat it is: This is really peer pressure of a different kind. We take our cues on what to do to fit in (and avoid guilt) by looking to social norms–what other people are doing in the same situation.The research: Frey and Meier (2004) studied the decision to give to student funds at the University of Zurich. When students were told that historically more than half of students gave to the fund, they were more likely to also contribute. Shang and Croson (2009) also showed that when donors were told what others had contributed, it affected the size of their gift.How to do it: In all of your fundraising materials, make it clear that others support and value your work. Some of the easiest ways to show this social proof include: donation tickers and thermometers, testimonials and quotes from current donors, and charity ratings badges based on positive reviews of your work.4. Gift Exchange/ReciprocityWhat it is: A gift exchange happens when people feel obligated to repay gifts or return a favor, even if they know the gifts are intended to get them to take action.The research: Falk (2005) found that illustrated cards from street children in Bangladesh increased the relative frequency of donations.How to do it: Although address labels and totebags come to mind, get more creative when it comes to using the idea of reciprocity in your fundraising. Think about how your incentives or tokens of appreciation tie back to your mission and connect your donors with the end result of their gift. This could mean an exclusive tour of your facilities, a personalized note from a beneficiary, or a custom video from your volunteers. A gift exchange doesn’t need to be expensive, it just needs to be sincere.5. Identifiable VictimWhat it is: When our minds turn to statistics or large numbers, we tend to think about problems in abstract, and feel less connection to them. To be inspired to give, donors need to be able to connect with your ask on a personal and emotional level.The research: Small, Loewenstein and Slovic (2007) discovered that highlighting an “identifiable victim” made donors give twice as much as when donors were presented with an abstract story or “statistical victim.”How to do it: We’ve written a lot about this phenomenon on this blog, but essentially it all boils down to focusing on one person to illustrate the human impact of your issue. Tell a compelling story that donors can comprehend, and they’ll be moved to give.6. Donor IdentityWhat it is: We tend to think of ourselves in a certain way or with certain ties to our social groups, community, or experiences. Therefore, when we are reminded about the identity, we are compelled to act in ways that feel consistent with it.The research: Kessler and Milkman (2015) showed that when donors were reminded of their identity as previous donors, they were more likely to give again.How to do it: In your fundraising appeals, invoke the idea of your donors’ identity to make your ask feel more relevant and personal. This might mean underscoring their connection to a certain neighborhood in your community, a specific alumni group, or a special factor that binds them to your cause.Want more ideas on how to implement these concepts into your fundraising communications? Check out our guide onHow to Make the Case for Giving or enroll in The Ultimate Donation Page Course.last_img read more