Faculty-Student Mentor Program inviting first-year students to join

first_imgCategories:AcademicsCampus Community Published: Sept. 23, 2014 Designed to make the transition to college life a smooth one, the Faculty-Student Mentor Program brings students and faculty members together with the goal of helping students excel academically, socially, and culturally and navigate the many opportunities CU-Boulder has to offer. Throughout the semester, small groups of students meet with faculty members every two to three weeks to discuss issues such as succeeding at CU, preparing for finals, managing time and balancing school and life. The program also gives first-year students the opportunity to get to know faculty and students beyond their residence hall and major.More than 2,000 first-year students are already participating. First-year students are encouraged to get their roommate or whole floor to join the program — students who join with at least two other people will be entered in a drawing for great CU prizes.Joining is simple: click this link and fill out the easy questions. Or send an e-mail to Carrie Olson, the program coordinator [email protected] and she will get you assigned to a mentor.The program has several exciting events coming up in addition to its regular networking opportunities.Events:  Mentee Meal Meeting – Have lunch or dinner with your mentor. Mentor Night at CU Women’s Volleyball in October with free pizza and T-shirts. End of the Semester Night at the Rec – A great event with competitions, prizes and end of the semester socializing.center_img Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-maillast_img read more

Nine teams miss Monster Energy Series qualifying

first_imgKevin Harvick eventually won the pole position in the Stewart-Haas Racing No. 4 Ford, clocking a lap of 198.405 mph in the final round to notch his second pole of the season.</p> “We don’t feel good about anybody missing qualifying, but it is something that happens when teams are pushing the envelope,” said Elton Sawyer, NASCAR Vice President, Officiating and Technical Inspection. “Teams know our expectations and every team was afforded the opportunity to go through inspection. Some needed multiple tries and some weren’t able to get their cars ready in time to qualify.” Earnhardt, scheduled to start 37th in the 40-car field, said he wasn’t overly concerned about how his starting spot would impact the No. 88 team’s efforts in Sunday’s race, Nine cars failed to make a lap during Friday’s Coors Light Pole three-round qualifying session at Texas Motor Speedway after they were not cleared in pre-qualifying inspection. NASCAR officials passed rules ahead of the season that require vehicles to travel through all stations on each pass through technical inspection. Any issue mandates that teams must complete their inspection pass, then address any issues in their garage stall before beginning the process of cycling through each station again. Jimmie Johnson’s spin during the opening round of qualifying brought out the red flag momentarily and allowed several cars more time to get through tech. It was the only on-track issue during the three rounds of qualifying on the repaved and revamped 1.5-mile track. Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chase Elliott, Kyle Busch, Kasey Kahne, Kyle Larson, Erik Jones, Chris Buescher, Derrike Cope and Timmy Hill were the drivers whose cars did not pass inspection in time to make a qualifying attempt. They all will start from the back in Sunday’s O’Reilly Auto Parts 500 (1:30 p.m. ET, FOX, PRN, SiriusXM NASCAR Radio). Larson, a winner two weeks ago at Auto Club Speedway and the current series points leader, was slightly more concerned by his starting spot. “I don’t know exactly what happened; we just didn’t make it through tech,” said Larson, scheduled to start 32nd on Sunday. “Yeah, this is not the place you want to not make it through tech. It will be really hard to pass, I think, on Sunday. Wherever we end up starting is going to hurt us.” Reed Sorenson and Paul Menard were the last cars to make it through tech in time to make a lap.Busch’s team worked feverishly to repair his No. 18 Joe Gibbs Racing Toyota this afternoon, as Busch smacked the wall with approximately 40 minutes remaining in Friday’s opening practice. Adam Stevens, crew chief for Busch’s No. 18, attributed the car’s failure to make it to the pre-qualifying grid on pit road to a mistake made in the rush to make repairs to the team’s primary car. Busch is scheduled to start 34th in Sunday’s 500-miler. “Well, we were just behind the eight ball having to fix that car, so obviously we got in line really late and in our haste, we didn’t get our tech blocks set correctly,” Stevens said. “So we passed templates, passed the grid, passed undercar, passed everything except when we got to the scales, which is the very last thing, and the wedge has to be within a certain number and we were below that number. That’s just for tech — it’s not for on the race track — so the car was all set to go and we didn’t get a chance to set our tech blocks because we were in such a hurry, so just an error on our part.” “There’s an awful lot of cars coming through … if we get out there, we get out there; if we don’t, we don’t,” Busch told FS1, standing in the garage during the opening round. “I ain’t too worried about it,” said Earnhardt, who is set to start 37th Sunday. “The races are pretty long. Pit selection bothers you a little bit because we won’t be able to get out there and get a better pit stall, but we’ll see where we end up on pit road. I don’t know what was wrong with our car going through tech, but if you don’t make it, you don’t get out there and I like that. I like the rules being the same for everybody so we’ll just — we’ll work on our car for tomorrow in practice. I’m anxious to get more track time. Certainly, the track’s going to be changing so freakin’ much. We didn’t really get a chance to see where it was going today.” RELATED: Qualifying resultslast_img read more