Your Top-Rated Animal Kingdom and Hollywood Studios Restaurants

first_imgShare This!I’m back with more results from our recent Disney World dining survey. Today we’re looking at your top-rated Animal Kingdom and Hollywood Studios restaurants. (Here are the best Magic Kingdom restaurants, and here are Epcot’s best restaurants.) Like those earlier posts, today’s analysis is based on more than 122,000 Disney World dining surveys we received in 2016.The Best Animal Kingdom RestaurantsLet’s start with the park’s quick-service restaurants. As before, restaurants in green are significantly better than average, while restaurants in red are significantly worse than average: Animal Kingdom Quick Service Restaurants Harambe Market58189.2 Royal Anandapur Tea Company11295.5 Dawa Bar19294.8 Kusafiri Coffee Shop and Bakery20087.5 Tune In Lounge10788.8 Thirsty River Bar and Trek Snacks7991.1 Fairfax Fare32886.2 Anaheim Produce14891.9 Mama Melrose’s Ristorante Italiano76987.5 Nomad Lounge10797.2% RestaurantNumber of SurveysThumbs-Up % Yak & Yeti Local Food Cafes68590.9 All of the Studios’ table service restaurants are rated below the average for all Walt Disney World restaurants. I think Hollywood Brown Derby is better than average – its Pork Three Ways is fantastic. I also think the prices keep the ratings down.I’ll be headed back to the Studios over the next month, getting ready to start updating the Unofficial Guide for 2018. In the comments below, let me know what your favorite restaurant and thing to eat is in the park. I’ll give them a try and report back.Want to let us know your picks? Take our user survey where we ask about every aspect of your trip. ABC Commissary1,04776.5 Tusker House1,51692.7 RestaurantNumber of SurveysThumbs-Up % Trolley Car Cafe Starbucks24993.6 Hollywood Studios Table Service Restaurants 50’s Prime Time Cafe1,36488.4 I’m disappointed in PizzaRizzo. Disney (rightfully) closed the old Pizza Planet in the same location, ostensibly to freshen up the concept and get ready for Toy Story Land and Star Wars crowds when they start to arrive in 2018 and 2019, respectively. The decor changed, but the low-quality pizza stayed exactly the same.Remember that Disney had $2.5 billion in profits in its most recent three-month quarter. Management has the money to make better food. They choose not to.The best place to get a quick meal at the park is the Starbucks on Hollywood Boulevard.Here’s the Studios’ table service restaurants: RestaurantNumber of SurveysThumbs-Up % Yak & Yeti79992.1 Sci-Fi Dine-In Theater Restaurant1,25086.2 Catalina Eddie’s15784.1 If you’ve not been to Nomad Lounge, try it before the Pandora crowds arrive in May.  Every one of our reviewers (including me) thinks highly of Tiffins. The drinks are vastly different than what you see around Disney property, the small-plate appetizers are interesting, and the drink flavors and alcohol are all in balance.Tiffins’ Wagyu Strip Loin and Braised Short RibWe’ve done a number of reviews of Tiffins, the park’s newest table service restaurant, all of them positive. The food is substantially better than anything you’d find in, say, the Magic Kingdom, and as good as anything you’ll get at Epcot or the Studios.As for the rest of the Animal Kingdom’s sit-down places, almost all of them are better than average. The one exception is the Rainforest Cafe, which does much worse than average almost every year. The menu is simply too big and too diverse for the kitchen to do any of it well. Your best bet is to stick with something simple, like a hamburger, or just wait to eat until you get back to your hotel.The Best Hollywood Studios RestaurantsIf you want to know the state of food service at Hollywood Studios, consider these two things:Disney closed the two highest-rated restaurants in the park, and replaced them with nothing.The park has as many open restaurants rated “much worse than average” as above average. Hollywood Studios Quick Service Restaurants RestaurantNumber of SurveysThumbs-Up % Eight Spoon Cafe3375.8 Mean = 89.7, sdev=6.1 PizzaRizzo (new)7380.8 Flame Tree Barbecue1,42594.9 Tamu Tamu Refreshments Photo courtesy of Disney (c)Tamu Tamu Refreshments serves Dole Whip floats, which is not coincidentally the substance that scientists feed laboratory mice to test addiction. (I’m, like, 99% sure on that.) Also doing well is the Harambe Fruit Market, wedged between Kilimanjaro Safaris and some gift shops. It’s got a good selection of chilled fruits, probably very refreshing on hot days.Two of my personal favorites, Flame Tree Barbecue and Royal Anandapur Tea Company, also do well. Flame Tree’s seating has been expanded over the past year, with lovely views of either its own multi-level terraces, or the waterfront where Rivers of Light plays at night.Harambe Market comes in at about average for the park. I think the food quality here is better than the rating shows. The original ordering system, where you had to go to multiple windows to order different foods, may have been dragging down Harambe’s ratings. On my last visit, you could order most items from more windows. We’ll see if that helps.At the bottom of the Animal Kingdom’s counter-service restaurants are Pizzafari and the Eight Spoon Cafe. Pizzafari may be the worst pizza in Walt Disney World, and that’s saying something. The crust is too doughy and often feels undercooked. The culinary statement made by the sauce and toppings is that the cooks hate what their lives have become.I’m not sure why the Eight Spoon Cafe’s mac-and-cheese-based menu is rated so low.  The one time I’ve tried it, it wasn’t terrible. If you’ve sampled it, leave a comment below and let us know your thoughts.Here’s the Animal Kingdom’s table service ratings chart: Writer’s Stop (closed)26995.2 Harambe Fruit Market18297.2 Starring Rolls Cafe (closed)74094.6 Pizzafari49879.7 Rosie’s All-American Cafe17882.0 Restaurantosaurus51086.9 Sweet Spells16894.0 Mean = 89.7, sdev=6.1 Tamu Tamu Refreshments25197.6 Mean = 89.7, sdev=6.1 Dinosaur Gertie’s Ice Cream10890.7 Backlot Express97084.6 Studio Catering Co. (closed)5076.0 Zuri’s Sweet Shop12795.3 Tiffins19492.8 Hollywood Brown Derby72787.8 Min & Bill’s Dockside Diner20175.6 Rainforest Cafe55883.2 Hollywood & Vine1,24179.5 Animal Kingdom  Table Service Restaurants Mean = 89.7, sdev=6.1last_img read more

Can WDW Quick Service Dining Be Romantic?

first_imgShare This!Just when I thought I had pondered every Disney question under the sun, I was asked something I had never heard before, “Can you suggest a budget-friendly, romantic meal at Disney World for a young couple (not table service)?” Essentially this guest was asking, “What’s the most romantic quick service restaurant?”Geyser Point at the Wilderness Lodge has a romantic viewThere are plenty of articles about romantic Disney table service restaurant (Victoria & Albert’s, and many others). Could there be such a thing as a romantic quick service?First, let’s consider what makes a restaurant romantic. Some factors that might be conducive to a romantic atmosphere include:Lighting: Harsh light looks good on no one. Romance is about soft shadows, so we’re looking for something with dim lighting, or perhaps candles.Ambient noise level: When you’re whispering sweet nothings, you want to be able to hear them. So, the overall decibel level needs to be low to moderate.Music: Music in the background could be fine, but you probably don’t want anything too frenetic or powerful.Personal space: With romance, you want to have at least the illusion personal space. No one needs to overhear your pet names for each other.Sight lines: You don’t want to be looking at anything that takes you out of the moment. Lovely outdoor scenery is perfect. A view of the bathroom door is not. Most things in between are neutral.Food: There are romance-friendly foods from many cuisines, but for an important romantic meal, you’ll want to avoid menus that are heavy on the garlic or other breath-killers.Alcohol: Of course, alcohol is never mandatory, but sometimes a glass of wine or a perfectly blended cocktail can warm up the mood.Are there any Walt Disney World Quick Service restaurants that meet at least some of those criteria? The champagne at Amorette’s ups the romance factorAccording to the Disney website, there are 196 quick service venues at WDW. Many of them are food trucks, stalls, or windows where there is no place to sit. Since romance involves lingering, let’s eliminate those right off the bat. Let’s remove the quick service places at the ESPN Sports Complex and at the Water Parks due to too much background screaming, as well as the food courts at the value resorts because you’re likely to be swarmed by a cheer team at any moment there. That still leaves well over 100 options for quick service.Being more surgical, let’s look at some options park by park.In the Magic Kingdom, contenders are:Be Our Guest, lunch: plus points for dim lighting, pleasant decor, French-ish menu, and availability of wine; minus points for noise level of excited children. Also the most romantic-sounding dish, Coq au Vin, will cost a not-so-budget-friendly $18.99 each. Ouch.Columbia Harbor House: plus points for the isolated and quiet second floor dining space, and the grilled salmon and lobster roll are relatively refined foods for a theme park; minus points for the lack of adult libations, and while the upstairs is dark and quiet, it’s not particularly pretty.Casey’s Corner: This is clearly a dark horse candidate. It’s nearly impossible to look dreamy eating a hot dog, but if you take your food to the nearby lawn, you can have a sort of picnic with a view of the castle. Sigh.Is it possible for a hot dog shop to be romantic?At Disney’s Hollywood Studios, contenders are:Docking Bay 7 in the soon-to-be-opened Galaxy’s Edge: I haven’t see the seating area yet, and it’s sure to be a zoo for many months, but having the ability to say, “I love you,” “I know,” to each other in Star Wars Land might just be the most romantic thing I can think of.Other than that the pickings are slim. No one is finding romance at the ABC Commissary.At Disney’s Animal Kingdom, contenders are:Satu’li Canteen: plus points because the food is good and there are beer and wine options, and the lighting is on the darker side. If you can manage to grab and outside table near dusk when it’s not too hot or crowded, the view of Pandora is amazing. On the minus side, it has literally never been not too hot or crowded in Pandora.Yak & Yeti Local Food Cafes: plus points because there are outdoor tables that are often sparsely populated, the sangria is OK, and the mango pie is nice, shareable dessert. On the minus side, the food is only meh, and is it possible for a place with “Yeti” in the name to be romantic?Harambe Market and Flame Tree BBQ are both so-so choices. On the right day you might be able to find a quiet table near the water, but sausage and pulled pork are not typically thought of as romance foods.Tables behind Epcot’s Fish Shop have a lovely viewEpcot’s World Showcase is practically the epicenter of theme park quick serve romance. There are themed drinks and lovely views absolutely everywhere. Some contenders are:Katsura Grill: The outside tables have trees for shade and in the later afternoon, it’s rarely crowded.Les Halles Boulangerie-Patisserie: Ooh, la, la, perfect French food. But the seating there is horrible and loud. Take your cheese and baguette to a bench by the water, grab a glass of champagne from the walkway stand and problem solved.Tangierine Cafe: The food is tasty and, depending on what you order, it could be light. There are a few tables inside in the back that are dark and quiet.Yorkshire County Fish Shop: Like the hot dogs at Casey’s at the Magic Kingdom, the fish and chips served here aren’t exactly romance food, but the view of the World Showcase from the lakeside tables is perfection.La Cantina de San Angel: Again, great views of the lake and lots of tables for two nudge this into romance zone.While the value resort food courts are too loud and too bright for real romance, there are a few spots for romance at the moderate and deluxe resort quick service spots, as well as at Disney Springs.Hurricane Hanna’s, Yacht & Beach Club resort: On the plus side, great views of the lake and Stormalong Bay pool on the minus side, boring menu and not very private.Maji Pool Bar, Animal Kingdom Lodge Kidani Village: On the plus side, nice pool view and very isolated. On the minus side, the menu is limited and you’re never going to there if you’re not staying there.Sassagoula Floatworks, Port Orleans French Quarter resort: Beignets are romantic. That’s all you need to know.Geyser Point Bar and Grill, Wilderness Lodge resort: This hybrid quick service restaurant and bar has comfortable seating, delightful views of the lake, and a fun cocktail menu. No much to say in the minus column except that since is also a bar, the servers tend to hover, asking if you want more drinks.Amorette’s Patisserie, Disney Springs: This is primarily a bakery, so the meal menu is not large, but they do have savory crepes, champagne, and eclairs – really the perfect formula for romance. The setting is not particularly nice though, and if it’s busy it can get loud.Also keep in mind that many of the hotel lounges serve table service food at less than full table service prices. The lounges are often dark and quiet, sometimes with low-volume background music. These can be great choices for a romantic light meal, but if you’re trying to keep costs down remember that with any dining where there is service, you’ll have to budget for gratuities.Among the options here, my choices would be Geyser Point, Satu’li Canteen, Amorette’s, and, oddly Casey’s Corner. But of course romance is in the eye of the beholder and anything can be romantic if you’re in the right mood.What would your choices be for romantic quick service restaurants at WDW? Let us know in the comments.last_img read more

Tears, tributes for Lucky Dube

first_img26 October 2007Thousands of South Africans crammed into Johannesburg’s Bassline Theatre on Wednesday to bid farewell to music icon Lucky Phillip Dube, who was gunned down outside his home last week.Dube was shot and killed in what appears have been a botched hijacking in Rosettenville, Johannesburg last Thursday.During the memorial service, speaker after speaker said South Africa had lost a legend who had touched the lives of many through his music.Speaking on behalf of the minister of arts and culture, Professor Keorapetse Kgosile said Dube was one of the most important reggae voices to come out of this country.“He was a global ambassador for South African musical talent and heritage, but also a world-renowned African composer, singer, band leader, cultural activist, visionary and performer,” Kgosile said.Musician Sipho “Hotstix” Mabuse said Dube has left behind a legacy that would keep his spirit alive.Gallo Music Group CEO Ivor Haarburger said Dube’s death was senseless and a loss to millions. He described Dube as a quiet and reserved person whose performances on stage were amazing.“We had great visits to the world, he wanted to expose his music to the Americans and had performed in 81 concerts outside South Africa which were attended by thousands of people,” Haarburger said.Maskandi artist Bhekumuzi Luthuli could not hold back the tears as he broke down on stage while performing the song Usizi.“I didn’t know what to call him, either my father or brother, as I learnt a lot from him,” Luthuli said. “He was my fan and I was his.“He used to encourage me and told me which of my songs he liked and always watched me when I performed. He would later congratulate or tell me if my performance was bad.”SABC CEO Dali Mpofu said Dube was “still communicating with us, even in his death. The question is whether we are still listening to his message. I think he is asking what has gone wrong with us.”Paying tribute to their colleague, Dube’s band members sang two of his songs, while his fans did what Dube would have been expected of them if he were still alive – they jumped and danced.Band member Skipha Shabalala said the band had lost a great teacher who believed in reality, truth and respect. “We are all going to die one day, but why Lucky died in such a barbaric manner? We don’t need such people in our country.”Speaking on behalf of the Dube family, Job Dube said: “Lucky was a pillar of the family and we’ve lost, but God plans his things.”Dube was born on 3 August 1964 on a farm just outside the town Ermelo. He was the third child of Sara Dube.He was an artist that continued to break international barriers, and recently signed a deal with Warner Music International securing the European release of his latest album, Respect.Dube is survived by his mother Sara, wife Zanele and seven children, one brother and three sisters.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

Corey May, CFI, LPC Promoted to Director, World Headquarters Business Continuity at Nike

first_imgCorey May, CFI, LPC was appointed director, world headquarters business continuity with Beaverton, Oregon-based Nike. May began his career at Nike in 2009 as a retail manager transitioning to a loss prevention business analyst in 2011, district loss prevention manager in 2013 and most recently as senior manager, global loss prevention operations. He was a non-commissioned officer for the US Navy and holds a bachelor of business degree from University of RedlandsCongratulations Corey! – Sponsor – Information provided by our partners at Loss Prevention Recruiters Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

From Syria to the Olympics, refugee tells how she swam for her life

first_imgLast year Syrian refugee Yusra Mardini had to swim for her life when her boat broke down as she tried to reach Europe; this month the teenager will be swimming in the Rio Olympics. (Latest Rio Olympics stories)Yusra, who is a member of the first ever Olympic refugee team, told how she and her sister Sara feared they might drown after their overloaded dinghy started taking in water as they crossed the Mediterranean to Greece.Along with another refugee they jumped in the sea and pulled the boat for three hours through the water, saving the lives of 19 others.”When I was in the water there was fear. You don’t know whether you are going to live or die,” the 18-year-old said in a video interview published by the International Organization for Migration (IOM).Mardini, who will compete in the 100-metre freestyle, is among 10 athletes in the refugee team which will march behind the Olympic flag at Friday’s opening ceremony in Brazil.”When I was swimming for my life, I never would have believed I would be where I am now,” the IOM quoted her as saying.For the 1st time, #TeamRefugees is competing at the #Rio2016 Olympics: https://t.co/7st2hQy9T9via @Geneve_int pic.twitter.com/i0tv6xhr1V UN Geneva (@UNGeneva) August 2, 2016The two sisters, who now live in Germany, left their home in Syria’s war-battered capital Damascus a year ago and headed to Turkey.One evening they boarded a dinghy on the Turkish coast along with 20 others – around three times as many people as it was designed to carry.advertisement”Before you go on the boat, people tell you that you are going to die,” Sara told IOM in an interview published on Monday.”So the first thing you think about when you get on that boat is death. You don’t think of anything else.”Hundreds have died crossing the Mediterranean from Turkey as they tried to reach Europe after fleeing conflicts and political turmoil in the Middle East and elsewhere.COLD AND EXHAUSTEDSara, also a swimmer, said she told her sister that if their boat capsized during the journey they should just try to save themselves as it would be impossible to help everyone else.But when the engine stopped and the boat started deflating she realised she could not let the others drown.”We needed to have less weight on the boat and nobody else besides us could swim … When I first got into the water my whole body was shaking like it does just before competition,” she said.”At that very moment I felt that life was bigger than me alone. All the people on that boat were part of me.”I thought it was my duty to jump in the water … if I (had left) them I would feel bad with myself for the rest of my life.”She described how her father’s friend cut off her trouser legs in the sea to stop her clothing weighing her down.After two hours she was battling exhaustion and knew she risked falling asleep and drowning.”It was getting dark and cold, the wind was blowing and I was freezing. I could not open my eyes any more, they were full of salt water,” she said.They eventually arrived on one of the Greek islands in the middle of the night.Her sister Yusra says she hopes her story will inspire others.”Now we are training really hard,” she said. “I think about making my parents proud and everyone who supported me.”The teenager has three dreams. “I hope that they will open the borders for refugees, and I hope to get a medal in the Olympics, and that my home town is in peace again.”last_img read more

What Honey Boo Boo Taught Me about Fundraising

first_imgMy Network for Good colleague Caryn Stein recently wrote this post. It has my all-time favorite headline. For that reason alone, it merits sharing. Enjoy. And thanks, Caryn.In a recent episode of TLC’s “Here Comes Honey Boo Boo” (oh yes, we went there), Honey Boo Boo* (real name: Alana) decides the family should create a lemonade stand to raise money for an upcoming beauty pageant. You might be surprised, but this popular pageant princess can actually teach nonprofits a few things about fundraising – no lemons required.Have Personality. Whatever else you might say about Honey Boo Boo, the girl has personality. Let your nonprofit’s unique quality shine through on your website, in your social media outreach and in your fundraising appeals. (Need ideas? Try these 7 Ways to Show Your Nonprofit’s Personality)Be Bold and Colorful. What color did Honey Boo Boo choose for her lemonade stand poster? Neon pink, of course! Follow suit and make your DonateNow buttons big, bold and colorful to stand out and make it easy for your supporters to donate. (Make your DonateNow button more effective with these tips.)Put Good Stuff in It. Honey Boo Boo’s lemonade recipe calls for at least five pounds (!) of sugar in each batch. Yikes. While we’re not advocating a sugar overdose, don’t forget to pay attention to your special recipe when communicating with your donors. (Make your outreach stand out with these 6 Foolproof Tips for Great Nonprofit Content.)Don’t Be Afraid to Make the Ask. Honey Boo Boo’s not shy about asking for what she wants (understatement), and you shouldn’t be either! As we head toward year-end fundraising season, practice making clear and direct calls for your supporters to make a donation. (Learn the Art of the Online Ask.)Be Grateful. At fifty cents a glass, it may take a while for Honey Boo Boo to save up for her next pageant dress, but she knows that giving an enthusiastic thank you to each patron is good business sense. It’s a simple thing, but it matters to your supporters. (Read why thanking donors is so critical – and learn how to do it properly.)*Don’t know Honey Boo Boo? Wikipedia can help.last_img read more

How to get your message out

first_imgWe write a lot about how to inspire supporters with compelling stories and clear calls to action, but even the most well-crafted messages are worthless if no one sees them. In addition to your outreach via email marketing or direct mail, it’s equally important to ensure your cause is well-represented through press outreach, social media, and search. Tomorrow, Network for Good is hosting afree webinar for nonprofits to learn more about effective publicity tactics from our friends at PR NewsChannel. This is a great opportunity to get your questions answered and pick up some practical PR tips from the pros, just in time to put them into place for your fall events and year-end fundraising campaigns.Register now for the live webinar on Tuesday, July 30 at 1pm ET. (If you can’t attend the event at that time, go ahead and register — you’ll receive an email with the playback recording of the session, plus the slides.)last_img read more

6 Quick Behavioral Economics Lessons for Fundraisers

first_imgLast month I had the chance to listen to Professor Judd Kessler of the Wharton School during the Ruffalo Noel Levitz Annual Fundraising Conference in Minneapolis. He shared insight on how behavioral economics can affect nonprofit fundraising. Wait, what the heck is “behavioral economics”? Think about it as simply understanding the factors and situations that influence behavior and motivate people to take action. Wait, what the heck is “behavioral economics”? Think about it as simply understanding the factors and situations that influence behavior and motivate people to take action. Many researchers have tested which scenarios prompt more charitable donations, many of which are illustrated in The Science of Giving.But behavioral economics isn’t only the territory of PhDs. Professor Kessler encourages all nonprofit marketers to consider themselves to be scientists and to use simple A/B tests as experiments in their fundraising laboratory to sort out what will drive their donors to give more.So, what are the principles that can affect fundraising for both small and large nonprofits? Here’s a quick overview of six common concepts and how you can use them in your fundraising strategy.1. Accountability & RecognitionWhat it is: This is the idea that if someone cares what other people think of them, they may give to appear more generous, responsible, or important.The research: Gerber, Green & Larimer (2008) showed that voter turnout in Michigan was affected when registered voters received a message that indicated other voters would be notified of their neighbors’ voting habits. In a different study, donors were found to give more when they were recognized as consistent donors to a fund.How to do it: Accountability and recognition are two sides of the same coin, with recognition being usually perceived as the more positive of the two. Offering public recognition for donors can inspire donors to give to achieve and maintain the recognition, and this same attention can influence others to give to gain the same status. Give donors a special status when you feature giving opportunities on your website, in your newsletter, and in upcoming appeals.2. Peer PressureWhat it is: In this case, the peer pressure comes from the simple power of the personal ask. If someone personally asks you to do something (especially in person or on the phone), you’re more likely to go along with the request to avoid embarrassment and disappointment, or to win praise.The research: Meer and Rosen (2009) showed that those who were called in addition to receiving a mailed solicitation were more likely to give.How to do it: In addition to your direct mail and email appeals, make sure you are calling or meeting with key supporters to make that personal connection and encourage them to complete their gift. Bonus: you’ll likely learn more information that will help you nurture the relationship or fix issues that may have prevented future giving.3. Social Information/Social ProofWhat it is: This is really peer pressure of a different kind. We take our cues on what to do to fit in (and avoid guilt) by looking to social norms–what other people are doing in the same situation.The research: Frey and Meier (2004) studied the decision to give to student funds at the University of Zurich. When students were told that historically more than half of students gave to the fund, they were more likely to also contribute. Shang and Croson (2009) also showed that when donors were told what others had contributed, it affected the size of their gift.How to do it: In all of your fundraising materials, make it clear that others support and value your work. Some of the easiest ways to show this social proof include: donation tickers and thermometers, testimonials and quotes from current donors, and charity ratings badges based on positive reviews of your work.4. Gift Exchange/ReciprocityWhat it is: A gift exchange happens when people feel obligated to repay gifts or return a favor, even if they know the gifts are intended to get them to take action.The research: Falk (2005) found that illustrated cards from street children in Bangladesh increased the relative frequency of donations.How to do it: Although address labels and totebags come to mind, get more creative when it comes to using the idea of reciprocity in your fundraising. Think about how your incentives or tokens of appreciation tie back to your mission and connect your donors with the end result of their gift. This could mean an exclusive tour of your facilities, a personalized note from a beneficiary, or a custom video from your volunteers. A gift exchange doesn’t need to be expensive, it just needs to be sincere.5. Identifiable VictimWhat it is: When our minds turn to statistics or large numbers, we tend to think about problems in abstract, and feel less connection to them. To be inspired to give, donors need to be able to connect with your ask on a personal and emotional level.The research: Small, Loewenstein and Slovic (2007) discovered that highlighting an “identifiable victim” made donors give twice as much as when donors were presented with an abstract story or “statistical victim.”How to do it: We’ve written a lot about this phenomenon on this blog, but essentially it all boils down to focusing on one person to illustrate the human impact of your issue. Tell a compelling story that donors can comprehend, and they’ll be moved to give.6. Donor IdentityWhat it is: We tend to think of ourselves in a certain way or with certain ties to our social groups, community, or experiences. Therefore, when we are reminded about the identity, we are compelled to act in ways that feel consistent with it.The research: Kessler and Milkman (2015) showed that when donors were reminded of their identity as previous donors, they were more likely to give again.How to do it: In your fundraising appeals, invoke the idea of your donors’ identity to make your ask feel more relevant and personal. This might mean underscoring their connection to a certain neighborhood in your community, a specific alumni group, or a special factor that binds them to your cause.Want more ideas on how to implement these concepts into your fundraising communications? Check out our guide onHow to Make the Case for Giving or enroll in The Ultimate Donation Page Course.last_img read more

A Road Less Travelled Highlights Gap in Maternal Health Services for Kenya’s Maasai Communities

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on February 14, 2013March 21, 2017By: Sarah Blake, MHTF consultantClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)A Road Less Travelled, which is a partnership project led by Anglican Overseas Aid, Australia that supports nomadic pastoralists to improve maternal and child health within their communities in Ethiopia and Kenya, featured a blog post this week underscoring the challenges that go with efforts to fill the gap in health service coverage for women in Maasai communities in Kenya raising several questions about the role of traditional birth attendants within efforts to improve maternal health in these communities.  From the blog post:The question now is: what can be done to bridge the gap? Could empowering the TBAs more help to bridge the gap, and contribute more towards safer deliveries? Should training be provided to TBAs to improve their skills? Should they be linked with the formal health system so that TBAs and professional health workers act collaboratively to assist women during pregnancy?To view the GMCH2013 video and PowerPoint presentation  by James Senjura of the Mothers’ Union of the Anglican Church Kenya (MUACK), A Road Less Traveled’s partner in Kenya, click here.For additional information, visit A Road Less Traveled’s Blog here and their January guest post on this blog here.Share this:last_img read more

A Fresh Focus on WASH, Maternal and Child Health

first_imgPosted on March 4, 2013March 21, 2017By: Charles Banda, Executive Director, Freshwater MalawiClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Imagine giving birth, or watching a loved one give birth, in a mud-floored hut without access to clean water or a basic latrine. This is the reality for millions of women in Malawi and other developing nations.In Malawi, approximately 30% of people in rural areas lack access to clean water and more than half lack basic sanitation. Malawi is one of most perilous places for a woman to give birth, with nearly 40% of rural women giving birth at home. The birth rate is among the highest in Africa, at over 40 births per 1,000 people, and the maternal mortality ratio is also exceptionally high, with approximately 460 deaths for every 100,000 live births.As Oliver Cumming of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine pointed out at the Global Maternal Health Conference (GMHC2013) in January, but the vast majority of home births in Malawi take place in a home that lacks improved water and/or sanitation facilities. Changing this will require taking on many challenges. For instance, upwards of 80% of Malawi’s inhabitants live in rural areas, so distance to health services is a major challenge. The geographic proximity to emergency obstetric care is a key factor in determining the risk of whether or not rural deliveries will be safe, but even in the presence of medical care, lack of access to a clean water source and sanitation facilities can lead to severe risk of infection for both women and babies. However, efforts are underway to improve conditions for birthing mothers in Malawi.Her Excellency, Dr. Joyce Banda, the President of Malawi, has recently sanctioned the President’s Initiative on Maternal Health and Safe Motherhood to address barriers faced by women in rural areas to giving birth at a health facility. This is achieved in part through the construction of Maternal Waiting Shelters, which are built adjacent to birthing centers or health clinics, and provide a place where women can stay with an attendant prior to giving birth.The shelters will allow rural expectant mothers to make the long journey to medical clinics before the onset of labor, while providing them a space to wait until they are ready to give birth. The implementation of these new waiting shelters will reduce the risks that go with giving birth at home in remote villages with traditional birth attendants, often far from any medical, clean water or sanitation facilities.In order to further improve maternal health in Malawi, Freshwater Malawi together with its U.S.-based sister organization, Freshwater Project International, has developed an idea that is focused, but comprehensive it its approach. Our proposal is a pilot project that includes a community-driven, social work approach to the provision of a fresh water source (borehole) and sanitation facility (latrine) at a Maternal Waiting Shelter built adjacent to a health center/birth facility in a rural area of southern Malawi. ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: The project will also include neonatal hygiene care/behavior change training and resources for healthcare professionals to implement with expectant women in the waiting shelters. A site-specific assessment study of the maternity ward at the health center and delivery of a 40-ft container of obstetric-specific medical supplies and equipment will be implemented by our partner organization, Project C.U.R.E.Monitoring of key health, social, environmental, and performance indicators will be used to quantify and demonstrate the benefit to maternal and neonatal health. The primary objective is to reduce incidences of infection at birth. The expected impact of the project includes a reduction in maternal mortality in the southern region of Malawi. This project is innovative because it utilizes a comprehensive, cross-sectorial approach to saving lives at birth through the provision of safe, sanitary access to WASH resources and further strengthens the obstetric capacity of the health centers. If the pilot project is successful, plans will be made to scale up the initiative at other Maternal Waiting Shelters throughout the country.For more on the WASH and Women’s Health blog series coordinated by WASH advocates, click here, or visit WASH Advocates.Share this:last_img read more