Klopp not nervous amid Premier League title fight

first_imgLiverpool manager Jurgen Klopp insisted he was not a “nervous person” as his side continue their bid to win the Premier League title.Klopp’s men visit West Ham on Monday, a day after Manchester City host Arsenal with the possibility of closing the gap at the top to two points.A two-time Bundesliga winner with Borussia Dortmund, Klopp said he had no nerves as he called on his team to remain focused. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Man Utd ready to spend big on Sancho and Haaland in January Who is Marcus Thuram? Lilian’s son who is top of the Bundesliga with Borussia Monchengladbach Brazil, beware! Messi and Argentina out for revenge after Copa controversy Best player in MLS? Zlatan wasn’t even the best player in LA! “I am not a nervous person and so I was never nervous before we won the first title at Dortmund. That’s how it is,” he told UK newspapers.”Experience showed me that the way I did it in the past worked, so I didn’t change. The only thing I always knew is to do the right thing as often as possible, stay focused on your own way and don’t think about the other things around, and do it as much and as good as you can.”Then, if you are good enough, it will happen. If not, it will not happen. That is pretty easy. Our tool to sort the situation is football. That is the only thing we can do.”Klopp pointed to Liverpool’s run to last season’s Champions League final as proof they could deal with pressure.But with Liverpool having last won a league title in 1990, Klopp understands how desperate fans are to achieve domestic success.”Will there be nervous moments? Yes, for sure. But don’t make them bigger than they are because there were nervous situations last year, two years ago, three years ago,” he said.”The people here really, really want it and that’s how it is. They want it with all they have. I get that and we will try with all we have, but there are no guarantees.” Subscribe to Goal’s Liverpool Correspondent Neil Jones’ weekly email bringing you the best Liverpool FC writing from around the weblast_img read more

How truly great fundraising can flourish

first_imgOver the past year, researchers Adrian Sargeant and Jen Shang have sought to answer the question, how can truly great fundraising flourish?It’s a timely question given that half of fundraisers want to quit – and a quarter of bosses said they fired their last fundraiser.The report – commissioned by the firm Clayton Burnett Limited – is out, and I wanted to share the findings. (You can get the report and executive summary for free at the firm’s website – just give a it a day or two for them to email it to you.)One answer was that organizations with incredible growth in fundraising have achieved that with the right people. Successful organizations have strong fundraising managers who achieve desired change through a combination of will and personal humility. They “devote considerable attention to what they regard as the critical building blocks of success, namely building an exceptional team, structure(s) and culture.”I’m going to highlight here some of the ways high-performing organizations built their teams. For additional findings, check out the full report.1. The manager built or retooled the fundraising team members and focused on a few, small early wins. This led to “improvement in confidence and morale, which became self-sustaining as individuals began to recognize their own potential to succeed. Technical expertise on the part of team members was important, but so too was conscientiousness, a willingness to support others, and a propensity to engage in appropriate levels of risk-taking.”2. The researchers note this shift in culture addressed turnover woes. “After the right team had been built, none of the organizations we examined suffered from the high turnover rates that otherwise pervade our sector. Being a part of a successful team appears to engender high levels of loyalty and our all our leaders were personally invested in their teams. The loyalty thus cut both ways. It was also interesting to note that those who defined their team more broadly, to include external agency personnel also exhibited a high degree of loyalty to that agency. Some were maintaining relationships with suppliers that had existed for over a decade.”3. Once a strong team was in place, they focused on the big picture in the right ways. Says the report: “We also found evidence in goal setting, that our outstanding leaders aligned their organizational metrics with the longer term drivers of donor value. Their objectives were couched not in the short-term minutia that typically pervade our sector, but in the standards and behaviours they identified would add value forsupporters and thus pay-back in the longer term. Their appraisal and reward systems were similarly aligned, to focus team member ambitions on the things that mattered most to longer term growth.”That said, the researchers also emphasized the system in which these people work: “Great systems are often more important than great people. A well-designed system filled with ordinary but well-trained people can, according to academic research, consistently achieve well above average performance.”I wish we saw more of these approaches. What works at your organization? Which of these ideas resonate with you? Who are your people and what are your systems?last_img read more

Setting Up Online Donations for Nonprofits

first_imgSetting up online donations for your nonprofit organization not only makes your job easier, but it also increases charitable donations by making it easier for donors to give. Consider the typical process of a traditional donation when someone was inspired by an ad or speech:Wait until they get back homeRemember that they wanted to make a donationFind a checkbookFind an envelopeFind your address & write it outFind a stampMail out the donationContrast that with the simplicity of online donations:Pull out a smartphoneEnter your organization’s name in a search engineFind the donation pageClick the donation buttonThat’s the difference between a minute versus what often took days, to a week, to complete. The immediate ability to click a “donate now” button allows donors to complete their transaction and eliminates the likelihood of them forgetting somewhere along the way. How may donations have been lost due to a willing donor not having a checkbook handy or not having a stamp? Probably many.For a very small organization, it may be enough to set up a PayPal payment page, but for an organization of any size, particularly one with ongoing or repeated nonprofit fundraising, it is very important to have a customizable donation website. A donation website should also be “responsive,” meaning it is designed to provide optimal viewing on various-sized screens, from phones to desktops.As in the example above, many people use their smartphones for Internet access. They need to be able to navigate through your page in a sensible way and don’t want to be scrolling around a large page trying to find where to click.Another reason to have a customizable site is that you can include your branding, which speaks powerfully to your committed donors. They need to feel that they are participating in your cause, not just dropping money.DonateNow is fundraising software that we use for donation websites. There is more information plus quite a few screen captures on our website, which give you a better idea of how a good online fundraising website should look. Whether you choose to use this software or not, browse through our pages that show how the program works and what it looks like to get a good idea of what to look for and what you can expect from fundraising software.Network for Good has a blog with more free information on how to be successful at nonprofit fundraising. We also have specialists available to discuss how we can help you get the most out of your fundraising efforts, so contact us today or call 1-888-284-7978 x1.last_img read more

How Did You Handle…? 2 MORE Examples of Change Ups for 2014 Year-End Campaigns

first_imgRead Part One This post continues our new How Did You Handle…? series—specific how-tos based on your experiences. There’s still time to make productive changes to your year-end appeal! Here are more year-end campaign change-ups, attempted for the first time this year by some of your fundraiser peers (with early results where available).1. Change-Up: Launching matching gifts for first-time donors (including those coming in on #GivingTuesday).We secured two donors—one who is an absolutely new donor—to offer a dollar-for-dollar match (up to $1,000) for all first-time donors. We are also offering a separate $500 match to new online donors on #GivingTuesday.As director of development, I pushed the match approach and found supportive donors. I was thrilled when our executive director jumped on board and found a matching donor for #GivingTuesday.But that’s not all. Our executive director pledged a $500 gift if all staff members contribute to the campaign. Great news: Our board is already at 100%!Goal: I had used the matching challenge in other types of campaigns and found it highly successful in increasing the number of new donors and total gifts. We’re hoping to achieve the same value this year. We’ll keep you posted! Results to Date: Just starting our year-end campaign (our executive director hand-signs all appeal letters and adds personal notes to many of them).Source: Alan Gibby, director of development, Shelter Care Ministries2. Change-Up: Revising our channel and format mix for year-end appeals to include direct mail for prospects who don’t read our emails.After digging into our email database statistics, we noticed that many of our donors don’t check their emails. Direct mail is our best hope for engaging these folks; this way we know they’ll receive an appeal. We’re sending them our first-ever direct mail appeal.Goals: We hope to strongly encourage our consistent donors to increase their gifts and reactivate our lapsed donors.Source: Kiki Fornito, development associate, Build ChangeNote from Nancy: Other fundraisers reported very different changes in their year-end channel and format mix:· “We are moving to an 80-20 split between email and direct mail outreach to members in our fundraising campaigns; the goal is to convert members to donors. Early results are positive,” reports Laural Bowman, political affairs manager with the Ohio State Medical Association.· “We are reaching out via phone to donors as a supplement to our direct mail year-end campaign. Of course, we’re tracking what impact these calls, which are low cost but labor intensive, have on results, and we’ll use that data to fine-tune next year’s year-end approach,” says Jayme Hayes, president of Junior Achievement of the Eastern Shore.Whatever your organization’s mix, the crucial takeaways are to always look hard at response patterns to year-end and other fundraising campaigns and to do more of what’s working and less of what isn’t.If one of these approaches makes sense for your organization—based on data and anecdotes, not just gut instinct—see if there’s at least some small way you can incorporate it into remaining elements of your year-end campaign. It just might make a difference!With refreshing practicality, Nancy Schwartz rolls up her sleeves to help nonprofits develop and implement strategies to build strong relationships that inspire key supporters to action. She shares her deep nonprofit marketing insights—and passion—through consulting, speaking, and her popular blog and e-news at GettingAttention.org.last_img read more

3 Reasons to Develop a Middle Donor Program

first_imgThe word “middle” doesn’t always have the best connotation. From having “middle child syndrome” to being “middle of the road,” this word’s often associated with those things that are unfavorable or just plain innocuous.Another middle to add to this list is “middle donors.” These are the people who give your organization more than a typical annual gift, but not enough to warrant personal attention as a major gift prospect. Depending on your organization, those gifts can range anywhere from $500 to $50,000. It can be tricky to find the right balance of outreach and attention for this group of supporters, but I think it’s worth the time and effort to find that balance.Think about it this way: we all know the ubiquitous gift pyramid. Its design is based on perfect symmetry and alignment. Those middle stones are integral to the stability of the pyramid. That’s why developing a middle donor strategy is time well spent.There are three reasons why your organization should consider developing a middle donor program:Today’s Middle Donors = Tomorrow’s Major Donors? This group of donors is your pipeline to your future major gift donors. If you don’t have a donor giving circle, this is a good place to start. And if you do have some higher annual fund giving society, you are on the right track! A giving circle recognizes the higher annual investment of these donors by allowing them special access to your work through invitation-only events or special publications. Building those relationships now could lead to bigger donations in the future. They Are A Valuable Source of Regular Revenue: While every middle donor is not going to become a major gift prospect or donor, these donors have self-selected a higher level annual gift to your organization with relatively little effort. Retention rates among this donor group are usually higher than with smaller donors. So, just think about what potential may exist for increased annual revenue with a little more personalized level of communication about your work and special opportunities that deepen their connection. Inspire Others to Give More: Developing and promoting a middle donor program also gives smaller donors an incentive to upgrade their own giving. For some donors, knowing that they will get a distinct set of “benefits” and recognition in your annual report, on your website, and in other ways with a slightly bigger annual gift may just be the incentive they need to commit to a larger level of support.A middle donor program should feature manageable “benefits” for donors that celebrate their support at this level and provide them with special “access” to your leaders and programs. You also want to combine a higher-level communications calendar of electronic and print materials with some staff management.Your development staff who manage this program (can be one or two people depending on the size of the donors in this giving level), will be handle a larger portfolio of donors than their major gift colleagues. So they won’t be able to develop a personal relationship with every donor in this group. But they will prioritize the middle donors, make or coordinate personal solicitations for larger annual gifts, and capacity screen these donors to recommend who might be good major gift donor potential. This program is also a good way to involve volunteers who give at this level. You might think of appointing a chair and/or small (emphasis on small) committee whose charge is to solicit other middle donors to encourage the peer-to-peer solicitations.I think you’ll be amazed what a wonderful investment a middle donor program can be for your organization’s fundraising efforts.last_img read more

4 Ways to Get More Out of Your Fundraising Events

first_imgFundraising events are a nonprofit mainstay, but they typically take a lot of time, money, and effort to produce. Since even the most basic events can run into the tens of thousands of dollars, it’s important to squeeze every opportunity out of these big investments. All too often, though, many nonprofits see the event itself as the finish line, missing critical opportunities for more connection, insight, and inspiration (hint: all things that will lead you to more loyal donors and increased giving).To get more out of your next fundraising event, keep these four points in mind.1. Use all available online channels to promote and manage your event.Take your invitations, communication, and marketing online as much as possible to save money and reap the benefits of social media. Empower your supporters to boost your fundraising total by giving them tools to spread your message to their networks. On top of the additional tickets you sell, you’ll see fabulous word of mouth exposure for your cause. Use an online fundraising event tool to sell and manage your event tickets, collect additional donations and allow non-attendees to donate. Consider launching a peer fundraising campaign tied to your event to give your board members and table leaders another way to raise even more money for your mission. (Bonus: Network for Good’s event pages and peer-to-peer fundraising campaigns are mobile-optimized for your success!)2. Understand the unique opportunity of a captivated audience.In-person events are an amazing opportunity to make face-to-face contact with the donors that help make your mission happen. Listen for feedback and consider setting up a booth to gather testimonials from your most passionate supporters. Don’t forget to provide plenty of ways for event attendees to become even more involved with your work, such as signing up for volunteer projects, joining your email list and newsletter, and giving on site with easy-to-use mobile donation options.3. Make your event part of a larger campaign.Instead of thinking of your event as a time-bound, in-person fête, make sure it connects to your other fundraising and advocacy campaigns. Tie your event’s marketing to your larger development strategy. Use the event as a springboard to develop more robust partnerships with sponsors and to create deeper relationships with your loyal donors. Show event attendees how their involvement supports your year-round programs or more specific goals.4. Focus on the follow up.Create a cultivation plan to turn event attendees into ongoing donors. Tag and track these supporters in your donor management system so you can communicate with them specifically, welcome new supporters to your mission, and update them on their ongoing impact. With simple segmentation, you can also create more relevant appeals when it comes time to invite your event fans to give again. Plus, by reporting on event attendees, you’ll have a clearer picture of the lifetime value of these donors and the overall impact of your events.By maximizing the fundraising opportunities before, during, and after your event, you’ll ensure the money and time you put in are well worth the investment. Ready to get more from your gala, luncheon, golf tournament, or other fundraising event? See how Network for Good’s easy-to-use fundraising software can help.last_img read more

The Next Big Thing in Fundraising: Emoji Appeals

first_imgWe all know that mobile technology is changing the way we communicate, work, and give. It was only a matter of time before the popularity of emojis, those cute little icons you see in text messages and social media updates, made their way onto the fundraising scene. Now, entire appeals are being written just with emojis! Talk about the art of brevity! Check them out:This dog rescue gets right to the point. These dogs need your love, a good home, and your donation to support their care. Bonus points for the sense of urgency:Want to give back to your local education group? There’s an emoji appeal for that, too! I love how this organization outlines the option to give via mobile.Helping to support meal delivery to seniors in the neighborhood has never been easier! This appeal knocks it out of the park by clearly outlining who will benefit and exactly how a donor’s gift will be used:Pandas need your help now! This emoji appeal illustrates that short and sweet can work when it comes to inspiring donors to give.Want to reach those Millennial Alumni to help support your scholarship fund? Emojis to the rescue once again! I love that this appeal offers donors options for completing their donation.Here’s an example of a gala invitation. Who could resist attending a night out, complete with top hat, all to benefit a good cause?Of course, today is April 1, which means I’m just teasing about emoji appeals! Some things are no joke, though, like:Having a donor management system that allows you to effectively communicate with your donors through email.Making sure your appeals are rooted in a compelling story that elicits emotion from the donor.Paying attention to the power of mobile to encourage anytime, anywhere giving.Thanks for sharing a laugh with us today! We’ll be back with regularly-scheduled programming next week. In the meantime, share your favorite April Fool’s joke with us on Twitter.last_img read more

Snapshots of Gender and WASH Innovations in India

first_imgPosted on March 7, 2013June 21, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The following guest posts provide snapshots of the work of three recipients of Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation grants for work on innovative WASH and gender interventions in India.By Akhila Sivadas,Project Director, Center for Advocacy and Research, New Delhi: Rajasthani camp, a cluster of 600 households in South Delhi, is one of the 27 settlements where the Center for Advocacy and Research is facilitating the formation of Women’s’ Forums, which enable the community to collectively negotiate with the municipality for better sanitation services. Like all other settlements we have worked in, the women of Rajasthani Camp were frustrated with broken toilets, clogged drains, and garbage heaps in their community. The Women’s Forum launched a multi-pronged initiative this past fall. Armed with the community-specific disease data that emerged from a health conversation we convened, the Forum raised their concerns with a local leader who pressured authorities to fix the situation. Their persistence and determination has already paid off: toilet renovations are currently underway.By Sampath Kumor,Project Director, Rajiv Gandhi Charitable Trust, The Self Help Groups of Rajiv Gandhi Charitable Trust provide potent platforms to discuss and disseminate the objectives of the WASH and gender project. Women from socially and economically marginalized groups have now found a forum to discuss subjects that have always been disapproved and stigmatized. For communities with little choice but to defecate in the open, the process of identification of the risk and vulnerability of the same (particularly for adolescent girls) is a step closer towards the aim. In addition, targeted Self Help Groups for young women are utilizing peer-to-peer discussions to address menstrual hygiene management. The march is on!By Kathleen O’Reilly, Texas A&M University: In our research on successful sanitation habits in rural West Bengal and Himachal Pradesh, we have learned that using a toilet is so commonplace for mothers with young children that they often do not recognize the advantages gained by having a toilet. Despite casual replies to questions about the convenience of a household toilet, observation of mothers’ daily routines reveals that they take advantage of the toilet’s proximity by leaving children unattended when they use it. We have found that the toilet has become so useful and so habitual that women are no longer conscious of the burden it would be to take children with them for open defecation.For more in the WASH and Women’s Health blog series coordinated by WASH advocates, click here, or visit WASH Advocates.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Equipped With a Checklist: Bringing Postnatal Care to the Community

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on October 14, 2013June 12, 2017By: Allison Ettenger, Program Manager, Jacaranda HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Cross-posted from the Jacaranda Health blogJoyce*, a healthy mother, glows as she admires her new baby. Her husband  collects her belongings as she prepares to leave Jacaranda Maternity, and she hugs the community health worker who provided her discharge education: “See you in a few days,” she says. Most health care providers in Kenya – or across the developing world –would schedule a new mother’s six week postnatal visit, hope she returns for it, and call it a day. Jacaranda thinks otherwise.In the past decade there have been significant resources invested in pre-natal healthcare in resource-poor settings: expectant women are encouraged to attend four antenatal care visits, receive nutrition training, and are linked to malaria and HIV treatment. However, we have all too often ignored the most vulnerable part of the maternity experience: The postnatal period. Approximately 75% of neonatal deaths occur in the first week after delivery and in Kenya alone, 31 newborn deaths occur per 1,000 live births.It’s not as if the evidence for how to close this gap is lacking: Research from countries like Bangladesh, Ghana, Nepal and Malawi has shown that community-based early postpartum care in the first week after delivery has great potential to increase newborn survival and reduce death. Contact with trained health workers can improve early initiation of breastfeeding, thermal care, infection prevention and clean umbilical cord care – all practices that can save newborns’ lives. However, there are still too many babies dying in the few days after birth, and new mothers often find it difficult – if not impossible – to recognize danger signs when she takes her new baby home. If we can get hands-on education and care to women in the critical first few days after delivery, we can cut down on delays in seeking care and reduce the risk of newborn death.To continue reading, visit Jacaranda Health. Share this:last_img read more

Setting Targets That Will Work

first_imgPosted on January 21, 2014November 7, 2016By: Aparajita Gogoi, Executive Director, CEDPA India and National Coordinator, White Ribbon Alliance IndiaClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)As we approach the 2015 deadline for the Millennium Development Goals, what does the future hold for international maternal mortality targets? The MHTF is pleased to be hosting a blog series on post-2015 maternal mortality goal setting. Over the next several weeks, we will be featuring responses and reactions to proposed targets from around the world. Please share your thoughts with us! A lot of global discussion and many high level meetings are taking place to end of preventable maternal deaths in the post 2015 world. We hear of an ambitious global target being set is to reduce maternal mortality ratios to less than 50 per 100,000 live births by 2035.The strategies that are being discussed to reach this goal are around preventing deaths by dealing with the direct medical causes of maternal deaths-like haemorrhage, pre-eclampsia and eclampsia, sepsis, unsafe abortion; and indirect causes like HIV, malaria, tuberculosis, anaemia, or non-communicable diseases.Additional strategies that are being talked about are: universal health services, providing financial incentives, including the private sector, and urbanisation.Working in a country which accounts for almost a quarter of global maternal deaths, I cannot but help wonder will setting targets help bring down maternal deaths in my country?Girls and women in my country are dying not just due to lack of skilled attendance or health services.  The reasons for this apathy for girls and women are very deep rooted, mired in traditional, almost misogynistic mindsets.  Girls are killed before they are born. In the last 3 decades, 12 million girls have been killed in our country before they were born.  In many parts of the country, sex ratio has dropped to fewer than 850 females per 1000 males. In a nation and people who do not protest the killing of unborn girls, how do you make them feel for women dying in childbirth? Will target setting for preventing of maternal deaths make any difference in the lives of girls and women in India?   India is ranked 132 out of 148 countries on Gender Inequality Index as per the 2013  Human Development Report. One in every 4 women faces violence, and a rape takes place every 22 minutes. Worse than the prevalence, is the widespread acceptance of gender based violence. Half of our adolescent girls (and 57% of adolescent boys) think it is justifiable for a man to beat his wife!We can be called a nation of child brides-with almost half of our girls are married before the age of 18. We know that girls who give birth before the age of 15 are 5 times more likely to die in childbirth. India has 113 million adolescent girls and almost half of all adolescent girls are married before the age of 18. Women between the ages 15-24 years account for 52% of the country’s fertility and contribute to 45% of the maternal mortality. Of the 56,000 maternal deaths in India each year, more than 25000 are young mothers. Whatever be the target set for the post 2015 world, we will never meet the same if we do not look at preventing these child marriages.One way of ensuring that we meet post 2015 maternal health targets is to prevent girls from becoming mothers,and to do so, we need to ensure that girls complete secondary schooling –which will make them six times less likely to marry early as compared to others who have little or no education. Girls who are out of school are 4 times likely to have a child before their 19th birthday. Getting girls to compete secondary education will not only lead to better reproductive outcomes like increasing contraceptive use by 4 times, but economists say that if 10% more  girls go to school, our country’s GDP will increase on average by 3%!!Setting targets is very important, but alongside targets, we need to focus on strategies that include a systematic approach, addressing different cornerstones that promote women’s empowerment, ensure that girls stay in school, delay marriage and pregnancy, ensure the availability and uptake of sexual and reproductive health information and services, and create greater economic opportunities and thus build girls’ and women’s agency.If you would like to submit a guest post for to our ongoing series exploring potential goals for maternal health in the post-MDG development agenda, please contact Andrea Goetschius: [email protected] this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more